Archive for the 'yorku' category

Digital Humanities Librarian, York University Libraries

Mar 10 2011 Published by under escience, faculty liaison, job, librarianship, yorku

A terrific new opportunity at my institution. I'm not in the reporting department or on the search committee, but I can answer general questions about York and the environment. My email is jdupuis at yorku dot ca.

Position Rank: Full Time Tenure Stream - Assistant Librarian
Discipline/Field: Digital Humanities Librarian
Home Faculty: Libraries
Home Department/Area/Division: Scott Library
Affiliation/Union: YUFA
Position Start Date: August 1, 2011

Digital Humanities Librarian (Continuing Appointment)
Scott Reference Department

York University Libraries seeks a creative, motivated, innovative, and responsive librarian to provide leadership in the development of digital humanities resources at York, while serving as a member of the Scott Library Reference Department.

York University offers a world-class, modern, interdisciplinary academic experience in Toronto, Canada's most multicultural city. York is at the centre of innovation, with a thriving community of almost 60,000 faculty, staff and students who challenge the ordinary and deliver the unexpected.

The York University Libraries are comprised of one large central library, the Scott Library, and three branch libraries. Our collections contain over 6 million items, including over 45,000 electronic journals; 300,000 e-books; 2.5 million print volumes; and significant holdings in film, music, maps, data, and archival materials. We also play a strategic role in promoting York research in an online environment by providing online journal and conference publishing services, hosting an institutional repository, and collaborating with members of the community on digitization projects. The Scott Library Reference Department offers research services, participates in the Learning Commons @ Scott, has an active information literacy program, and is responsible for collection development in the humanities, social sciences, fine arts and environmental studies.

In the twenty-first century, digital libraries are as essential to humanities scholarship as physical libraries have been in the past. Digital humanities is an evolving specialization in librarianship. The incumbent will work closely with researchers, students and other subject librarians and provide leadership in incorporating technologies into the research activities of the humanities community at York University. This librarian will work collaboratively to develop strategies and environments for disseminating library resources in support of humanities research; contribute to the processes of digital media production, practice, and analysis in the humanities; engage in scholarly communication initiatives; and liaise and collaborate with digital humanities researchers. The successful candidate will also participate in the development of the collection in an area(s) related to his or her academic background.

The successful candidate will participate in teaching, reference, collection and liaison activities in the Libraries and elsewhere on campus, and be proactive in developing new programs and services. The chosen candidate will play a role in the ongoing development of information literacy initiatives; participate in special projects, such as assessment, and the development of web-based resources; participate in collegial processes of the Reference Department; serve on committees of the Libraries and of the University; and contribute to librarianship by carrying out professional research and scholarly work. Some evening and weekend work is required.

The successful candidate will have the following qualifications:

  • An ALA-accredited MLIS degree or equivalent with up to five years post-MLIS experience;
  • A strong educational background in the humanities;
  • A solid understanding of the research process and the ways in which new technologies are affecting the production, dissemination, and reception of texts in the humanities;
  • Demonstrated ability and interest in exploring and evaluating emerging technologies in support of digital humanities;
  • Understanding of scholarly communication and publishing issues and trends;
  • Demonstrated understanding of collection development and ability to liaise with faculty;
  • Demonstrated ability to provide reference, research instruction, and consultation in the humanities and social sciences;
  • Broad knowledge of print and digital information resources relevant to the social sciences and humanities;
  • Demonstrated understanding of the concepts, goals, and methods of information literacy instruction and an ability to teach in a variety of settings and formats;
  • Willingness to undertake work on library and university committees;
  • Willingness to contribute to the literature through professional development, research, and scholarship;
  • Expertise with current web technologies;
  • Demonstrated understanding of assessment strategies;
  • Evidence of leadership ability, professional initiative, and flexibility;
  • Excellent analytical, interpersonal, and communication skills;
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively in a collegial setting;
  • Ability to work with a large and diverse clientele;
  • Strong public service ethic and background.

This is a continuing-stream (tenure track) appointment to be filled at the Assistant Librarian level and appropriate for a librarian with up to five years post-MLIS experience. Librarians at York University have academic status and are members of the York University Faculty Association bargaining unit (http://www.yufa.org/). Salary is commensurate with qualifications. The position is available to commence in August 2011. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.

York University is an Affirmative Action Employer. The Affirmative Action Program can be found on York's website at www.yorku.ca/acadjobs or a copy can be obtained by calling the affirmative action office at 416-736-5713. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and Permanent Residents will be given priority.

York University resources include centres relating to gender equity, race and ethnic relations, sexual harassment, human rights, and wellness. York University encourages attitudes of respect and non-discrimination toward persons of all ethnic and religious groups and regardless of gender or sexual orientation.

The deadline for applications is 11 May 2011. Applicants are directed to submit a covering letter outlining their relevant qualifications and experience, a current curriculum vitae, and the names and contact details of three referees. Applicants are also asked to have two of their three referees submit written letters of recommendation directly under separate cover by mail, or email/fax with a mail copy following before the application deadline. Referees should be provided with a copy of this position advertisement. Applications and letters of recommendation can be sent to:

Chair, Digital Humanities Librarian Appointment Committee
York University Libraries
310 Scott Library
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario
M3J 1P3
Fax: (416) 736-5451
Email: yulapps@yorku.ca

Applications should be sent by mail, or email/fax with a mail copy following.

Posting End Date: May 11, 2011

No responses yet

Exploring Open Science with Computer Science undergrads

York University Computer Science & Engineering professor Anestis Toptsis was kind enough recently to invite me to speak to his CSE 3000 Professional Practice in Computing class.

He gave me two lecture sessions this term, one to talk about library-ish stuff. In other words, what third year students need to know about finding conference and journal articles (and other stuff too) for their assignments and projects. You can find my notes here, in the lecture 1 section.

In the second session, which I gave yesterday, he basically let me talk about anything that interested me. So, of course, I talked about Open Science. Here are the slides I used, heavily based on the talk I gave at Brock for Open Access Week a little while ago.

I tried to emphasize demoing the projects as much as possible rather than just talking about them. I also emphasized the Polymath-type projects more than in the previous talk -- a strategy suggested by Michael Nielsen in an email exchange.

How was the reaction? A little stunned, I think, perhaps because I covered a lot of ground in a short period of time, from the state of scholarly publishing to blogging networks. But overall, I did seem to have their attention so that's a good thing.

I'm giving this talk again to first year Computer Science students in January so I have another kick at the can to get it right. I think I'll pare it down quite a bit and try and talk in greater detail about fewer concepts as well as integrating my overview with the detailed case studies a bit better. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

And once again, thanks to Anestis for giving me this great opportunity.

No responses yet

All aboard the York University Space Elevator: Part Two

Jul 10 2010 Published by under engineering, yorku

Following up on my first post a while back, All aboard the York University Space Elevator!, the York University Earth and Space Science and Engineering research team of Raj Seth, Brendan Quine and George Zhu have published another paper, this time in The Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, Feasibility of 20 km Free-Standing Inflatable Space Tower. (Open Access version)

This paper describes the theory and analysis for the construction of a thin walled inflatable space tower of 20 km vertical extent in an equatorial location on Earth using gas pressure. The suborbital tower of 20 km height would provide an ideal surface mounting point where the geosynchronous orbital space tether could be attached without experiencing the atmospheric turbulence and weathering in the lower atmosphere. Kevlar is chosen as an example material in most of the computations due to its compatibility in the space environment. The Euler beam theory is employed to the inflatable cylindrical beam structure. The critical wrinkling moment of the inflated beam and the lateral wind load moments are taken into account as the key factors for design guidelines. A comparison between single inflatable cylindrical beam and inflatable multiple-beam structures is also presented in order to consider the problems involving control, repair and stability of the inflated space tower. For enhancing load bearing capacity of the tower and for availability of more surface area at the top, the non-tapered inflatable structure design is chosen for the basic analysis, however further analysis can be performed with tapered structures.

Once again, thanks to our Institutional Repository folks, the paper is once again Open Access, available for reading to the entire world here. (Thanks, Marcia!)

One response so far

Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship, Spring 2010

Another terrific issue. I'm going to list everything but the book & database reviews & reports so as not to clutter the post too much.

No responses yet

Job posting: GIS and Map Librarian, York University Libraries

May 19 2010 Published by under job, yorku

Here's a pretty exciting opportunity at my institution. Although not a science library position per se, there will be ample opportunity to work with science and engineering faculty and students.

Position Rank: Full Time Tenure Stream - Assistant Librarian

Discipline/Field: GIS and Map Librarian

Home Faculty: Libraries

Home Department/Area/Division: Map Library

Affiliation/Union: YUFA

Position Start Date: December 1, 2010

GIS and Map Librarian, York University Libraries

York University Libraries seeks an enthusiastic and service-oriented librarian with excellent communication skills to fill the position of GIS and Map Librarian. The successful candidate will be a creative and self-motivated person who works well with colleagues in a challenging and dynamic environment.

York University offers a world-class, modern, interdisciplinary academic experience in Toronto, Canada's most multicultural city. York is at the centre of innovation, with a thriving community of almost 60,000 students, faculty, and staff who challenge the ordinary and deliver the unexpected.

Located in the Scott Library, the Map Library supports a print collection of 112,000 maps, 5,000 aerial photographs and 6,600 atlases and books, as well as an extensive digital geospatial data collection. This library is staffed by the GIS and Map Librarian along with an additional 1.5 full-time employees and 6 part-time student assistants. Services include reference, reserves, circulation, collection development and maintenance, as well as cartographic information literacy.

The candidate will lead in the teaching, reference, collection and liaison activities for geospatial and map resources. A priority for the library is working with faculty to integrate library GIS data resources and maps into the curriculum. The librarian will have special responsibility for the Department of Geography collection, liaison, and, information literacy activities at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The candidate will provide research and teaching support in the use of map resources and geospatial and non-geospatial data to researchers across the disciplines including social science, humanities, science and engineering. The GIS and Map Librarian will liaise with the broader geospatial community: campus, provincial, national and international. The candidate will work closely with the York Data Librarian.

The position includes the management of the Map Library, its services and collections. The incumbent will inspire and foster innovation in the delivery of frontline and virtual service to the user community, and will provide leadership in developing optimal access to geospatial and map resources. The incumbent will supervise staff in the Map Library, prepare annual budgets and other reports, and advise on processing print and electronic materials including metadata standards for digital resources and cartographic materials.

The successful candidate will have the following qualifications:

  • An ALA-accredited MLIS degree or equivalent with up to seven years post-MLIS experience.
  • Educational background relevant to geography, GIS and Maps.
  • Extensive knowledge of and expertise with the use of geospatial data and GIS software packages.
  • Will have completed some courses in geomatics or GIS.
  • Expertise with non-spatial data resources, and statistical software packages.
  • Demonstrated understanding of developing linkages between spatial and non-spatial data.
  • Evidence of leadership and professional initiative.
  • Ability to work with a large and diverse clientele.
  • Extensive knowledge of print map resources and principles of organization including indexes and cataloguing standards.
  • Knowledge of information sources relevant to the map library user community.
  • Demonstrated managerial skills.
  • Experience in web authoring and web support technologies.
  • Demonstrated understanding of the concepts, goals, and methods of information literacy instruction and ability to teach in a variety of settings and formats.
  • Effective analytical, written and oral communication skills, including demonstrated skills in training, and public communications.
  • Demonstrated ability to multi-task and be flexible in a dynamic work environment.
  • A demonstrated commitment to developing, maintaining and sharing technical expertise
  • A demonstrated ability to work creatively and effectively, both independently and collaboratively as a team member.
  • Willingness to undertake library and university committee responsibilities, professional development, research and scholarship.

The GIS and Map Librarian is a continuing tenure-stream appointment at the Assistant Librarian level and appropriate for a librarian with up to seven years post-MLIS experience. The length of term for head of the Map Library is up to five years with possibility of renewal.

Librarians at York University have academic status and are members of the York University Faculty Association bargaining unit (http://www.yufa.org/). Salary is commensurate with qualifications. The position is available to commence December 1, 2010. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.

York University is an Affirmative Action Employer. The Affirmative Action Program can be found on York's website at www.yorku.ca/acadjobs or a copy can be obtained by calling the affirmative action office at 416-736-5713. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and Permanent Residents will be given priority.

York University resources include centres relating to gender equity, race and ethnic relations, sexual harassment, human rights, and wellness. York University encourages attitudes of respect and non-discrimination toward persons of all ethnic and religious groups and regardless of gender or sexual orientation.

The deadline for applications is July 30th, 2010. Applications should include a cover letter relating the applicant's qualifications to the requirements of the position, a current curriculum vitae, and the names and contact details of three referees are requested. In addition, please have at least two of your three referees submit signed written letters of reference directly under separate cover by fax or mail by the deadline. Please ensure each referee is supplied with a copy of this position advertisement and asked to address the requirements of the position.

Applications can be sent to:

Chair, GIS and Map Librarian Appointment Committee
York University Libraries
310 Scott Library
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario
M3J 1P3
Fax: (416) 736-5451
Email: yulapps@yorku.ca

Applications should be sent by mail, or email/fax with a mail copy following.

Posting End Date: July 30, 2010

No responses yet

Friday Fun: Mars Rover Beginning To Hate Mars

May 07 2010 Published by under friday fun, yorku

Ah, The Onion. A true repository of snark and snideitude

But as the winter lingered, Spirit began producing thousands of pages of sometimes rambling and dubious data, ranging from complaints that the Martian surface was made up almost entirely of the same basalt, to long-winded rants questioning the exorbitant cost and scientific relevance of the mission.
Project leaders receive data from the Mars rover Spirit.

"Granted, Spirit has been extraordinarily useful to our work," Callas said. "Last week, however, we received three straight days of images of the same rock with the message 'HAPPY NOW?'"

*snip*

"Hopefully these malfunctions will straighten themselves out," Callas said. "In the meantime, we'll simply have to try to glean what usable data we can from 'OVERPRICED SPACE-ROOMBA AWAITING MORE BULLSHIT ORDERS.'"

NASA remains optimistic that the rover will remain at least partially operational for the foreseeable future. However, because of the Spirit's recent proclivity toward ramming into boulders at full speed, scientists have remotely disabled its 1.5-pound rock-abrasion tool so the rover is unable to terminate the mission prematurely.

I find this particularly amusing given my institutions prominent role in the Mars-Phoenix project.

4 responses so far

What do students want from their libraries?

There's a massive libraryland industry organized around figuring out what students want from us in terms of space, collections, services, etc. We survey, observe and focus group them to death. And that's great and incredibly valuable. But sometimes I think we might have a tendency to see what we want when we're observing and they might have a tendency to tell us what they think we want to hear when we survey or focus group.

Personally, I like to do Twitter searches. It's an interesting way to find out what they're saying and thinking about us when they're being candid and brutal and don't think we're paying attention. So I do searches on Steacie, Scott Library, YorkU, YorkU Library and others to gather some intelligence.

I like this one I saw today:

i will never understand how people misread the sign scott library and somehow see student centre instead. HUSH UP!

Or this one (TH refers to the Tim Horton's coffee shops):

I swear that Yorku has implemented a "must have XL TH coffee" as 90% of students here are complying. Ah early mornings at the library.

Of course, we're in our exam period right now, so that really skews the results towards quiet and caffeine, but it's still very interesting and enlightening. Most of the time they bitch and moan, saying nice things and bad things, calling us out, pointing out where we fall down and where we could do things differently. They also reveal some of their own unrealistic expectations, a bit of a sense of entitlement, some student-to-student nastiness, some purposefully naughty behaviour.

Try some searches on your library -- I'd love to hear what students are saying in other places too!

15 responses so far

From the Archives: An update on my Computer Science & Engineering blog

During my winter blogging break, I thought I'd repost of few of my "greatest hits" from my old blog, just so you all wouldn't miss me so much. This one is from September 24, 2007. This post follows up on my initial 2007 post which I reposted yesterday.

It's worth noting that the blog has evolved such that it's hardly about or for engineering or computer science students at all; it's more for the sessions I do for "science for non-science students" courses. Also, the use of Meebo has been a huge hit for me, really creating a new way for me to interact with students.

=====

Way back in September I posted about an experiment I was running with a new blog directed at Computer Science & Engineering students here at York.

I'll excerpt myself a little to remind everyone what I was hoping to accomplish:

I've created yet another blog, this one I'm aiming at Engineering & Computer Science students at my institution. I have two main ideas for this blog: first, as a place to locate my IL related links and other information. In the past I've used static web pages and was pretty happy with them. However, over time (and mostly over my sabbatical) I thought that I might want something a little easier, a little more flexible, a little more interactive and mashupable. And I saw an example of what could be accomplished at Heather Matheson's OLA presentation.

It took me a while, but I think I've got something I can live with. It uses WordPress instead of Joomla; but it also incorporates some rss feeds like my linkblog and the new book lists from my library. It has Meebo so students can touch base with me directly. Mostly I like that I've been able to move over the old IL instructional pages I did in FrontPage with relatively little fuss and bother. The classes I've used it for so far seem to like it and the reception from faculty too has been positive. It just looks cooler.

Second, as a place where I can highlight York science profs in the news and post some interesting links to engineering/CS stuff I think is neat, useful or interesting. I plan on using the WordPress pages feature to add digested versions of the full blown pathfinders we have. As well I want to create a list of all the different IL pages so anyone can find them without scrolling or searching.

So, how did it the experiment go?

Overall, I have to say that I'm very happy with the experience.

Some things that I thought went really well:

  • Easy to create & maintain. I really like the WordPress interface. It's very easy to create a blog and set up a bunch of cool widgets for RSS feeds or whatever. The array of themes is impressive (although since I am using a local implementation, I only have a few choices). The wysiwyg authoring tool is certainly good enough for what I need. For the most part, I was able to transfer the old FrontPage versions I created a few years ago into WordPress by just copying and pasting the HTML code and altering it to my current needs. I think that there's also something to be said for how cool and "with it" the blog looks compared to a simple web page.

  • The stats. Since September, the blog has received 3,087 visits and 6,851 page views. Both those numbers make me very happy. No need to go into detail, but the posts I expected to be popular were (ie. bigger classes generated more hits than smaller ones), the keywords I expected to lead people to the blog did and the ebb and flow more-or-less matched the assignment due dates for the courses I was doing sessions for. I'm still getting a handful of hits every day.

  • Meebo. I love Meebo! During busy periods, I was averaging two or three IM sessions per week, sometimes more (by session I mean either live chat or a message left by a student). I was even getting students using Meebo to ask about courses that I wasn't doing a session for. Whether they were students who had my session in one of their other classes or not, that I don't know. Either way, it's still pretty cool that they found me and I was able to help. I even ended up chatting with a couple of librarians about using Meebo.

  • Class management. And speaking of Meebo. You know how when you do a lecture-style IL session there's always a bunch of students at the back of the class using laptops, probably doing email or playing poker? You know how hard it is to involve them? As well, we all know that a class can start with good energy then peter out after a while. Well, Meebo helped with both those things, believe it or not. After a few sessions, I got into the habit of starting every IL class by firing up Meebo on the demo PC I was using and inviting the students on the laptops to surf to the blog. Well, of course a whole bunch of beeping and other weird noises resulted as Meebo notified me that people were coming to the blog and starting to chat! Windows opening, weird chat sessions exploding all over the place. Of course, this is all quite amusing to the students. It also gets their undivided attention right at the beginning of the session and also lets them see what the Meebo widget is all about. I'd have to say that this little opening stunt got me at least 20 minutes of really good attention and energy in the class. I usually asked the students if they wanted me to leave Meebo open so they could ask questions during my demo but they always declined because they thought it would be too distracting.

  • Findability. One cool thing -- if you Google the course number for the majority of the sessions I did, my blog posting comes within the first few results. For many of them, it's number one, even before the course web page. A little disconcerting for the profs, I think, but great for the students -- and the profile of the library. In the sessions I would just say, "Hey, don't worry about remembering the url or the page or anything, just Google your course number!" Even a day after first publishing the post it would appear at or near the top of the rankings.

  • Profs Liked it. It looks cool, has all the main resources, is in a format that students can relate to, what's not to like? Just today I had a Prof remark to me that based on my blog he's considering using WordPress for his own course management needs.

Some things I'm still figuring out:

  • Branding. Although the blog is branded for CSE, in the end most of the classes I used it for were Natural Science, STS or other courses. So, I think I need to re-brand the blog, starting with a new name. Initially, my idea was to create a separate blog for the non-CSE areas but that's probably needless duplication. I think I'll end up with a name something like "York University Science Library Blog: Featuring Engineering, Computer Science, Natural Science and STS." Yes, we have other science library blogs for other areas.

  • Clutter. The design is still a bit busy for my liking. I probably need to pare it down a bit, maybe take out a few of the widgets. Way back when, Jane suggested embedding slides in the posts rather than just recording my notes/links as part of the post itself. That idea probably has a lot of merit and I may give it a try next year.

  • Informational Posts. By these I mean newsy posts about York or various profs. I didn't do as many of these as I hoped and I'm still not sure how useful they are. On the other hand, it's been really handy for demonstrating how blogs can be used to institutional outreach. The jury is out on these posts. I'll probably do a few more during the spring and early summer but I'll re-evaluate in the fall.

  • Sidebar content. Not sure how used or useful it was. I like that it gives students a reason to come back to the blog after the course is over but on the other hand it may just add clutter and distraction.

  • Resource Pages. I never did get around to creating mini-pathfinders for the various subject areas on some of the WordPress pages. We'll see how my thinking on that evolves over the summer.

If any of you out there on the Internet have any suggestions, feel free to jump in. If you're a prof or student, especially if you were involved in one of my sessions, I'd also really like to hear what you have to say.

No responses yet

From the Archives: Check out my new blog for York Computer Science & Engineering students

During my winter blogging break, I thought I'd repost of few of my "greatest hits" from my old blog, just so you all wouldn't miss me so much. This one is from September 24, 2007. It's my initial thoughts about the blog I've been using to post my IL session notes.

It's worth noting that the blog has evolved such that it's hardly about or for engineering or computer science students at all; it's more for the sessions I do for "science for non-science students" courses. Also, the use of Meebo has been a huge hit for me, really creating a new way for me to interact with students.

I'll be re-posting my 2008 follow up post tomorrow.

=====

This post is aimed a little more at the Engineering & CS profs and students out there; I'm interested in what you might think about this project.

I've created yet another blog, this one I'm aiming at Engineering & Computer Science students at my institution. I have two main ideas for this blog: first, as a place to locate my IL related links and other information. In the past I've used static web pages and was pretty happy with them. However, over time (and mostly over my sabbatical) I thought that I might want something a little easier, a little more flexible, a little more interactive and mashupable. And I saw an example of what could be accomplished at Heather Matheson's OLA presentation.

It took me a while, but I think I've got something I can live with. It uses WordPress instead of Joomla; but it also incorporates some rss feeds like my linkblog and the new book lists from my library. It has Meebo so students can touch base with me directly. Mostly I like that I've been able to move over the old IL instructional pages I did in FrontPage with relatively little fuss and bother. The classes I've used it for so far seem to like it and the reception from faculty too has been positive. It just looks cooler.

Second, as a place where I can highlight York science profs in the news and post some interesting links to engineering/CS stuff I think is neat, useful or interesting. I plan on using the WordPress pages feature to add digested versions of the full blown pathfinders we have. As well I want to create a list of all the different IL pages so anyone can find them without scrolling or searching.

I've also used the blog for some non-Engineering/CS classes, explaining that the current blog is just a prototype for future blogs in other areas. For example, I do a lot of Science & Technology Studies and Natural Science (NatSci are breadth courses for non-science students) courses and the posts don't really belong on the CSE blog. I would like to eventually create one for Nats/STS but I don't want to commit to it until I have a better idea of how successful the idea is. If you were a non-CSE student, would you be ok with your courses web page being hosted on a CSE blog?

I'm also particularly interested in what other librarians out there have done with IL or subject-focused blogs, how you've done things differently or the same. If you've preferred WordPress or Blogger or if you think that a more sophisticated CMS like Moodle or Joomla is the way to go. As usual, either drop a comment here, Meebo or email at jdupuis at yorku dot ca. Feedback, suggestions, ideas, pros, cons are all more than welcome; the blog is plainly a work in progress and I full expect it to evolve some more in the coming months.

No responses yet

YorkWrites: Celebrating York Creators and Innovators

Nov 11 2009 Published by under acad lib future, personal, yorku

I don't usually talk about local York stuff here, but I'd like to make an exception for the event we had last week (Tuesday, November 3rd) here at my library, The Steacie Science & Engineering Library.

The event is called YorkWrites and it's sponsored jointly by the Libraries and the Bookstore. Essentially, it's a big party in the library, with food, drink, music and speeches. In the past it was held at the Scott Library, the humanities & socials sciences library, but for 2009 we thought it would be nice to try a science and engineering focus.

What's it about:

YORKwrites is an initiative of York University Libraries and York University Bookstores, with a two-fold objective:

  • to celebrate all recent scholarly, research and creative works produced by the York community and promote them, internally and externally.
  • to document the scholarly, research, and creative works produced by the York community. This includes work by faculty, students, alumni and staff.

You can get more of an idea by poking around the website, our RefWorks publications database and the YorkWrites Blog, where we've been profiling York researchers.

There's a brief story here and here is the story in the York daily enewsletter, YFile, with a fairly nice picture of me.

There was much that was new and notable in 2008-2009 from the Faculty of Science & Engineering, such as the development of a prototype space elevator and the discovery of snow on Mars, not to mention the award-winning Mars rover project.

*snip*

Faculty, students, alumni and staff were on hand at the Steacie Science & Engineering Library last week for the YORKwrites 2009 gathering to toast each other on their research, publications and creative accomplishments. President & Vice-Chancellor Mamdouh Shoukri, Walter Tholen, interim dean of the Faculty of Science & Engineering, and Michael Siu, associate vice-president research, science & technology, were present to congratulate those whose output raised the profile of York.

"We owe York authors a great debt. It is through their work - scholarly, scientific, professional or creative - that the wider world learns about York," said Shoukri. "This is an important initiative and a cause worth celebrating."

One of the things we did a bit differently this year was to shift a bit of the focus to the kinds of things science people do as opposed to the focus in previous years which was more on monographs. What we did was put up a bunch of poster boards at the back of the library and get faculty and grad students to lend us some of their posters that we could put up for the event. This particular initiative was a great success as we got about 35 posters given to us, more than double what I was hoping for. We ended up improvising and putting a bunch of them up on the walls & windows.

In any case, there's some video here of Paul Delaney's toast to the authors and more pictures here.

It was a great event, a great party and a wonderful opportunity to raise the library's profile on campus and to forge closer ties to the faculties we serve, opening the door for further opportunities to collaborate. Some part of the future of libraries is in building collaborations and raising profiles and working together with stakeholders across campus. Be visible.

It was also great that some small bit of the spotlight was focused on all the great work that the people here at Steacie do every day.

No responses yet

« Newer posts Older posts »