Archive for the 'yorku' category

My talk: Evidence vs. Ideology: The Canadian Conservative Government's War on Science

Oct 31 2014 Published by under Canada, Canadian war on science, Politics, yorku

This past Tuesday I gave a talk as part of the York University Department of Science & Technology Studies' STS Seminar Series. Not surprisingly, my talk was centred on the work I've done as a chronicler of Canadian science policy issues. The title and abstract of my talk are:

Evidence vs. Ideology: The Canadian Conservative Government's War on Science

Canada has entered an era of decision-based evidence-making, where scientific and other evidence takes a back seat to an ideology of political partisanship in the service of economic development and “prosperity.” Where once we could hope that scientific evidence would play an important role in decision making in such areas as public health, resource development and environmental stewardship, this no longer seems to be the case. Using tactics such as the drastic budget cuts to government science departments, the muzzling of government scientists who want to discuss their research in public and turning government scientific infrastructure into a concierge for industry, the Conservative government is waging a War on Science. This presentation will look at some of the major causes, strategies and skirmishes in the war as well as some prospects for a ceasefire and perhaps even a fair and just peace.

The campus online newsletter has a nice preview story about it here, including a picture of me from last year's Death of Evidence mock funeral I helped organize as part of the Libraries' Scholarly Communications Committee.

I thought the talk itself went quite well, with good feedback during the questions and afterwards from attendees. One tweet, from York's Institute for Science & Technology Studies <a href="https://twitter.com/sts_yorku">twitter feed: "Hilarious, sobering talk on the state of government science by @dupuisj at today's seminar." What more can you ask for that to be both hilarious and sobering?

Doing the talk was a great experience and definitely a great honour to be asked to take part in this kind of seminar series. I'd like to thank Institute members Kean Birch and Denielle Elliott for inviting me to take part as well as all the various member of the Department and the Institute for making the arrangements so smooth.

And last but definitely not least, here are my slides.

Enjoy!

If anyone is interested in what's going on in Canadian science these days and would like me to deliver this talk or some approximation, I'd be happy to oblige. You can contact me at jdupuis at yorku dot ca.

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Mathematician and activist Lee Lorch, 1915-2014

Mar 17 2014 Published by under Canada, mathematics, Politics, yorku

York University mathematician and civil rights activist Lee Lorch died February 28, 2014 at the age of 98.

A few years ago I posted on the 2007 Joint Mathematics Meetings in New Orleans Lee Lorch where Lee was awarded the Yueh-Gin Gung and Charles Y. Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics.

The citation read:

Lee Lorch's mathematical research has been in the areas of analysis, differential equations, and special functions. His teaching positions have included the City College of New York, Pennsylvania State University, Fisk University, Philander Smith College, the University of Alberta, Howard University, Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm) and Aarhus University. He was at York from 1968 until retirement in 1985 and remains active in the mathematical community.

His scholarship has been recognized by election to Fellowship in the Royal Society of Canada; appointment to committees of the Research Council of Canada; election to the Councils of the American Mathematical Society, the Canadian Mathematical Society, and the Royal Society of Canada; and by many invitations to lecture.

Lee Lorch is a remarkable teacher of mathematics and an inspiration to his students. Among those he guided were Etta Falconer, Gloria Hewitt, Vivienne Malone Mayes, and Charles Costley. He has recruited into graduate work and mathematical careers many students who would not have otherwise considered such a path. [See V. Mayes, American Mathematical Monthly, 1976, pp708-711; and P. Kenschaft, Change Is Possible, American Mathematical Society, 2005.]

During the early organization of the Association for Women in Mathematics, Lee gave sage advice about the value of inclusiveness in supporting effective advocacy. He is responsible for the appearance of the preposition "for" in place of the initially proposed "of" in the name of the AWM.

Throughout his career he has been a vocal advocate and energetic worker for human rights and educational opportunities. His interventions, especially in the 1950's, led to changes in the policies and practices of the AMS and the MAA that ensured that all mathematicians could participate in the official events of these organizations. While his actions have not solved all the problems he addressed, surely his energy has contributed to much progress.

As an example, we cite events surrounding a meeting in 1951 held in Nashville. Lee Lorch, the chair of the mathematics department at Fisk University, and three Black colleagues, Evelyn Boyd (now Granville), Walter Brown, and H. M. Holloway came to the meeting and were able to attend the scientific sessions. However, the organizer for the closing banquet refused to honor the reservations of these four mathematicians. (Letters in Science, August 10, 1951, pp. 161-162 spell out the details). Lorch and his colleagues wrote to the governing bodies of the AMS and MAA seeking bylaws against discrimination. Bylaws were not changed, but non-discriminatory policies were established and have been strictly observed since then.

For his life-long contributions to mathematics, his continued dedication to inclusiveness, equity, and human rights for mathematicians, and especially his profound influence on the lives of minority and women mathematicians who have benefited from his efforts, the MAA presents this Yueh-Gin Gung and Charles Y. Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics to Lee Lorch.

A picture of a beaming Lee Lorch is here. There's also a nice article in the daily YorkU email newsletter about the award.

On paper, Lorch retired in 1985. But, as he likes to say, "I’m not retired. Unfortunately my salary is." At 91, he still uses an office at York and is collaborating on a research paper about Bessel functions with Prof. Martin Muldoon, a former grad student under Lorch in Edmonton and himself recently retired from York’s Mathematics Department. He’s given up teaching but travels to campus regularly and participates in meetings and other activities. Not as mobile as he once was, he uses a walker and relies on Wheel-Trans to get around. However, e-mail and the Internet have only fuelled his activism.

What’s remarkable, says Muldoon, is that Lorch still takes great interest in the mathematical community, especially its treatment of women and minorities. From his tiny home office, he reads five newspapers a day, including the New York Times. He sends flurries of e-mails daily about peace and justice issues – these days he focuses on Cuban-Canadian friendship – to friends and acquaintances in and out of the mathematical community. Only five years ago, he raised a fuss with the newly formed Fields Institute, a math organization in Toronto, over its first list of 33 fellows, all of whom were white men. Within two years, several women became fellows and the institute appointed a woman director.

It’s impossible not to admire Lorch’s persistence and courage. Does he feel he’s made headway in his struggles against racism, inequality and injustice? "Yes," he says, "but there’s a long way to go. These issues are still very much with us."

At the time, it was a great pleasure to note the award. Lee was an ardent library supporter and a very welcome visitor to my library, always willing to stop & chat, to share a story or two from his vast experience. I already miss seeing him around campus, usually with his friend Martin Muldoon.

He also donated many rare and unique books from his collection to the library, many of which I've had the pleasure of processing, making our collection a much better research-level collection. When Lee gave up his office a while back I went through many of the books in his office and added a bunch to the collection here at Steacie. In particular he had a lot of Russian books, both mathematical and of interest for the history of math in Russia and the Soviet Union. He even had a some communist children's books, as I recall. I remember fondly as we were going through the math books he'd often point to the Russian one we were looking at and remark on how rare it was outside Russia and thus important to have in a research collection. I think he got a lot of them via personal relationships with Russian mathematicians, especially while visiting them.

Lee was an active researcher up into his 80s and 90s. His most recent publication was from 2008, with his friend and former student Martin Muldoon: Monotonic sequences related to zeros of Bessel functions (OA version). His most recent sole author paper was from 2005: The First Positive Zeros of Cylinder Functions and of Their Derivatives. His earliest is from 1944: The Lebesgue constants for Borel summability.

Lee Lorch will be missed.

As is my habit, I'm listing some other items about Lee's life and work both in mathematics and advocacy.

Obituaries & Remembrances

 

General & Biographical

 

Other Material

If you knew Lee, please feel free to share a story or remembrance in the comments. As usual, If I've missed anything, add a link in the comments.

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Open Science for undergrads!

Earlier this week I was invited (er, invited myself, really) to give a talk to a class of first year computer science students about open access and open science. Sadly, there was a partial snow day that day and I was unable to actually give the talk. Which is too bad, because I've done similar talks before for undergrads and really enjoy the opportunity. In particular, the challenge I wanted to set forth for those budding computing professions was to be a part of developing software solutions for science on the web be they open access journals systems or web data hosting or whatver.

In any case, I hope I'll get to do this another time and hopefully in a variety of contexts. But for now, here are my slides. Questions, comments, suggestions are, of course, welcome.

Here's a link to the presentation.

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Science and the New Media Ecosystem, a talk by Bora Zivkovic at York University, May 6, 2013

Apr 29 2013 Published by under academia, culture of science, faculty liaison, yorku

A note for my Toronto area friends, Blogfather Bora Zivkovic will be giving a talk at York University in Toronto on May 6, 2013 from 2:00 to 3:30 pm.

Here's the info:

Science and the New Media Ecosystem

Bora Zivkovic, Blog Editor at Scientific American

Monday, May 6, 2013, 2:00 – 3:30 pm
Paul Delaney Gallery, Room 320, Bethune College
York University, Toronto
Map

Abstract:
The whole media landscape is shifting and changing – newspapers on the decline with blogs, Twitter and YouTube on the rise.

Science is no different. Come listen to one of the pioneers of online science communication talk about how this new media landscape is shaping how science is done, evaluated and communicated in an increasingly connected world.

If you can't make the talk, there will be also be a ScienceOnline Toronto Tweetup at The Duke of York that evening starting at 7pm. Sign up at the Facebook page or just show up!

The talk is open to the public. If you'd like to attend but aren't sure about the logistics of getting to York, campus maps and directions are here. Subway construction has made getting to campus a bit complicated, so be aware of the various transit options on the map/directions page.

You can also just email me at jdupuis at yorku dot ca.

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Around the Web: Access Copyright sues York University

Apr 16 2013 Published by under academia, Canada, education, yorku

Since I work at York University, I'm going to refrain from commenting on this lawsuit. However, as is my practice I'll be creating and maintaining a list of relevant articles and resources here to help me stay current on the matter.

I am not attempting to create a comprehensive list.

General

 

Some Related Items on Canadian Copyright from 2012 & 2013

 

Chronology & Background for Access Copyright/York University Lawsuit (including 2012 & Earlier)

 

As usual, if I've made any errors of if I've missed anything significant, please let me know in the comments or at jdupuis at yorku dot ca.

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Recent Presentations: Getting Your Science Online and Evaluating Information

As I mentioned way back on October 22nd, I was kindly invited to give a talk at the Brock University Physics Department as part of their seminar series. The talk was on Getting Your Science Online, a topic that I'm somewhat familiar with! Since it was coincidentally Open Access Week, I did kind of an A-Z of online science starting with the various open movements: access, data and notebooks. From there I did a quick tour of the whys and wherefores of blogs and Twitter.

There was a good turnout of faculty and grad students with lots of great questions and feedback, some more skeptical that others but definitely stimulating and, I hope, worthwhile.

Here are the slides:

Thanks again to Thad Haroun and the Brock Physics Department for inviting me!

And the other notable presentation was just yesterday, part of my intervention in a section of one of York's science-for-non-science-majors courses, Natural Science 1700 Computers, Information and Society. The prof, Dov Lungu, and I collaborated on a three-part Information Literacy section for the course. In my three one-hour sessions I covered some of the basics of surviving the information needs of university life and in the second part, a fairly typical library session on how to find resources for the class. The third part was a bit more interesting in that Dov gave me free reign to talk about evaluating information online, pretty well any way I wanted.

I wouldn't normally bother to share my course materials here on the blog, but I rather like the presentation I used and I thought it went over fairly well. The various ridiculous examples I used worked well to spark a bit of discussion in quite a large class.

As usual, I appreciate any feedback.

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York University Faculty Association (YUFA) Library Chapter letters to Minister James Moore in protest of the cuts to Library and Archives Canada

May 17 2012 Published by under Canada, Politics, yorku

My union, the Library chapter of The York University Faculty Association (YUFA) has released a couple of open letters to The Honourable James Moore, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages in the current Canadian government.

The letters protest the current cuts to staff and programs at Library and Archives Canada. The letters do sketch out the context but you can read more here, here and here.

I completely support these letters. You can consider them to be related to my series on the Canadian War on Science, perhaps under the title of The Canadian War on Library and Archives. In fact, there may be another post coming with just that title.

Some previous blog posts related to this topic:


Open letter to James Moore regarding cuts at Library and Archives Canada

[A PDF of this letter is also available.]

The Honourable James Moore, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages
House of Commons
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0A6

16 May 2012

Dear Minister:

On April 30, 2012, administrative staff at Library and Archives Canada announced that over two hundred professional staff had been served notice that their jobs were "under review," and that an estimated 105 positions are slated to be eliminated. This is an estimated 20% of the national institution's professional complement.

We protest this action, and on behalf of our communities we request you reconsider.

(The announcement was made in tandem with the news that the National Archival Development Program (NADP) and Canadian Council of Archives (CCA) were eliminated. Without prior consultation or warning to affected stakeholders, the decision was made to cut vital programs and services which feed into the pan-Canadian network of archives which serve researchers from across the country and internationally. We protest this action equally, and address it in a separate letter.)

Elimination of professional staff positions

These cuts include the elimination of 21 of the 61 archivists and archival assistants that deal with non-governmental records (materials that include the records of media theorist Marshall McLuhan, hockey legend Maurice Richard and musical genius Glenn Gould among many, many others); the reduction of digitization and circulation staff by 50% (in contradiction of your own public statements that the cuts were to improve online access to records, a process that relies on digitization); a significant reduction in preservation and conservation staff; and the closure of the interlibrary loans unit.

We are deeply troubled by the seemingly arbitrary decisions of ministry staff in making these cuts. Not only do these cuts make increasingly difficult the responsibilities of the remaining archivists and librarians, they also limit the ability of researchers in Canada and abroad to study and research our shared history.

Elimination of professional development opportunities

We are also concerned with the denial of leave or funding by the head of Library Archives Canada for LAC-BAC staff to present academic papers and attend professional conferences hosted by national organizations such as the Canadian Librarians Association. It seems uncharitable that he himself has been invited to present plenary speeches at both events yet prevents his own professionally trained staff from doing the same. Professional development is absolutely essential for institutions such as LAC-BAC to thrive, grow and be exposed to new ideas, technology and organizational approaches. To deny staff the time and funding to attend these professional gatherings is to invite institutional stagnation and apathy.

Closure of Interlibrary Loan Unit

Every week our Resource Sharing staff receives material from LAC-BAC for our faculty, students and staff researchers. Much of this material is scarce or unique: publications of Canadian serials, government reports and dissertations that are not available through commercial vendors. The closing of the ILL department at LAC-BAC will stifle scholarly research and prevent students and scholars who lack financial means from conducting their research at all. It is the elimination of an effective circuit of information, and replacing it with an antiquated, counterintuitive silo will prevent academic inquiry. As Joanna Duy of Concordia University has stated:

My own recent research has shown that university research indicators (total research funding dollars and number of publications produced) at Canadian universities are significantly positively correlated with the amount of Interlibrary Loan borrowing activity occurring at those institutions. This suggests what librarians have known for years: that there is a solid link between research activity and Interlibrary Loan. And while one might assume that, with the wealth of resources available to scholars online, Interlibrary Loan activity at academic institutions would be declining--in fact the reverse is true at Concordia, and a recent article published in the United States notes that Interlibrary Loan activity in that country's universities has also been on a steady upward climb for the last 35 years.[1]

On the most practical level, the majority of repository institutions operate on the assumption that the copy held at LAC-BAC is the authoritative copy that will always be preserved and accessible. What use is this approach when our national institution is shutting its doors to citizens who cannot afford to travel to consult these materials?

Libraries and archives are a pillar of Canadian heritage and democracy. The holdings of our national library and archival repository support research for publishing, science, technology development and many federal government initiatives. The impact of these cuts will be immediate and its effects will reverberate for years to come. They will undo decades of careful development and preservation of our shared collective memory.

We ask you to reconsider the elimination of these positions.

Yours sincerely,

William Denton

Web Librarian / Steward, Library Chapter, York University Faculty Association

[1] Joanna Duy, citing Collette Mak, "Resource Sharing among ARL Libraries in the US: 35 Years of Growth," Interlending and Document Supply 39, no. 1 (2011): 30.

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Open letter to James Moore about National Archival Development Program (NADP) and Canadian Council of Archives (CCA)

[The text here is incomplete and does not include two lists of projects where York University has used the NDAP and CCA. Please see the full PDF of the letter.]

The Honourable James Moore, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages
House of Commons
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0A6

16 May 2012

Dear Minister:

On April 30, 2012, administrative staff at Library Archives Canada announced that the National Archival Development Program (NADP) and the Canadian Council of Archives (CCA) were eliminated. Without prior consultation or warning to affected stakeholders, the decision was made to cut vital programs and services which feed into the pan-Canadian network of archives which serve researchers from across the country and internationally.

The CCA first received federal support in 1986 and over the last twenty-six years its distribution of federal funding has efficiently and successfully supported the development and advancement of archives in communities throughout Canada. The NADP cost the citizens of Canada $1.71 million a year to operate. In turn, it assists in the operation of the following programs:

  • Outreach and educational activities in communities to help small institutions manage their treasures
  • Development of the national on-line catalogue of archival descriptions, and its provincial and territorial counterparts, so all archives, including the very small, can reach Canadians
  • Provision of archival and preservation advice to archives
  • Job exposure for new graduates from Canada's archival and information studies programs
  • Access to archival holdings information on-line
  • Cataloguing of archival materials to make them accessible to the public
  • Training opportunities for local archives run by volunteers or one-person operations
  • Site assessments to both urban and rural archives, to safeguard Canada's documentary heritage
  • Preservation of at-risk documents and other archival materials, including electronic recordsThe NADP is a program with direct positive impact on Canadians in their own communities. The elimination of NADP will have a far reaching and devastating impact across Canada since we are now facing the collapse of the Canadian Archival System comprised of Provincial/Territorial Councils and their members in historical societies, religious archives, municipal archives, Aboriginal archives, ethnic minority archives, educational archives, and others--a system that is critical to the 150th anniversary of Confederation which we will celebrate in less than five years from now.

    Cutting this program will have a significant impact across Canada. In addition to six staff members losing their jobs at the CCA Secretariat, eleven archives advisors across the country will lose their jobs. Several provincial and territorial archives councils have suspended operations and thirteen are at risk of collapsing within one to six months; 90 projects for the 2012-2013 year have been cancelled, resulting in job losses at 74 archival institutions; the national office of the CCA will be closing, requiring that two organizations that share premises, the Association of Canadian Archivists (ACA) and the Canadian Historical Association must also move their operations; operations that support the development of ARCHIVESCANADA.ca[1], the national catalogue of archival descriptions are endangered; and managerial assistance to the National Archival Appraisal Board (NAAB) and the North American Archival Network International Council on Archives (NAANICA) is threatened.

    The NADP does not simply provide funding for the maintenance of consulting and advisory services for archival associations: the program also funds many projects across the country to ensure that archival material is preserved, arranged and described and made available to the public. Since 2006 it has provided archivists with the means to hire qualified professionals to generate finding aids, preserve fragile documents, digitize others for greater ease of access and generate electronic finding aids to contribute to their local union lists (in Ontario, this is Archeion.ca) and eventually consolidate records into ArchivesCanada.ca and the national catalogue.

    The NADP is not icing on the cake. It is a life-line for small institutions to hire professional expertise, buy preservation supplies, or hire a short-term contract archivist to ensure a project is completed.

    Since 1992, the Clara Thomas Archives & Special Collections has received $178,952 through various grants and funds managed through the Canadian Council of Archives. In turn, the university has contributed matching funds of $105,106 direct and $140,741 in-kind investment. Without the support of grants managed by the Canadian Council of Archives, none of these projects would have been possible. These funds covered projects that purchased vital preservation materials for historical photographs suffering from vinegar syndrome, as well as an ambitious digitization project that preserved live sound recordings of Canadian artists and provided free and open access to digitized materials to the public online. The support of the Canadian Council of Archives provided archivists at York University with the means to hire contract archivists to tackle challenging programming, description, digitization, and preservation projects. A list and cost breakdown of these projects is appended to this letter for your reference.

    What the federal government saves in the short term will be miniscule when compared to the long-term impact this will have on the local level in archives across the country and how it will undermine the ability of remaining professionals working at LAC to carry out their legal responsibilities as custodians of the federal government's records and, more broadly, as the keepers of the collective memory of the nation.

    In Ontario, we are facing the loss of three staff members employed by the Archives Association of Ontario (AAO), or the severe curtailing of their activities and programming. We are also looking at dozens of archival institutions that have been planning (often for years in advance) to apply for a NADP grant to tackle large-scale projects within their own operations being unable to follow through with these plans.

    The result of this cost-cutting will be the erosion of a national network of archival descriptions that we have fought for years to establish and grow. It will undermine our profession's ability to build and maintain our online databases. It may eliminate altogether the ability of many institutions to digitize materials at a quality and standard that will ensure long-term accessibility and preservation. Most importantly, it will impede access and promotion of materials that are essential to community-building and the education, enlightenment and empowerment of Canadian citizens.

    Archives are a pillar of Canadian heritage and democracy; archival materials support research for publishing, science, technology development and numerous federal government initiatives. The impact of these cuts will be immediate, its effects will reverberate for years to come and they will undo twenty-six years of national cooperation.

    On behalf of the community we represent, we ask that the elimination of the National Archival Development Program and the Canadian Council of the Archives be reconsidered.

    Yours sincerely,

    William Denton

    Web Librarian / Steward, Library Chapter, York University Faculty Association

    [1] ARCHIVESCANADA.ca provides Canadians with greater access to our national heritage. The Canadian Council of Archives, in partnership with the provincial and territorial councils, their member institutions, Library and Archives Canada and the Department of Canadian Heritage, invested resources to create ArchivesCanada.ca,an easy-to-use web application that provides access to hundreds of thousands of historical documents, images and other national treasures--available from the comfort of a classroom, home or office.

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Job Posting: Science Librarian, York University Libraries

Feb 09 2012 Published by under job, yorku

Come work instead of me!

Below is a posting for a 3-year contractually limited appointment in my unit. I'm chair of the search committee, so feel free to ask away with any questions about the position. I'll answer them to the best of my ability given the limitations of being on the committee.

As it happens, I'll no longer be the department head of Steacie Science & Engineering Library during the three year period of the appointment. For the first year, the successful candidate will be replacing me while I do a one-year acting Associate University Librarian appointment. The second year, I'll be back at Steacie but no longer as department head (my term is up) and the position will be replacing one of my colleagues while he is on sabbatical. The third year will be replacing me during my sabbatical.

Here's the posting:

Position Rank: Contractually Limited Appointment
Discipline/Field: Science Librarian
Home Faculty: Libraries
Home Department/Area/Division: Steacie Science and Engineering Library
Affiliation/Union: YUFA
Position Start Date: July 1, 2012
Position End Date: June 30, 2015

Science Librarian Contractually Limited Appointment

York University Libraries seek a self-directed and public service-oriented Science Librarian based in the Steacie Science & Engineering Library.

York University is the leading interdisciplinary research and teaching university in Canada. York offers a modern, academic experience at the undergraduate and graduate level in Toronto, Canada's most international city. The third largest university in the country, York is host to a dynamic academic community of 62,000 students, faculty and staff, as well as 240,000 alumni worldwide. York's 10 Faculties and 28 research centres conduct ambitious, groundbreaking research that is interdisciplinary, cutting across traditional academic boundaries.

The Science Librarian will be responsible for faculty liaison, collection development and the delivery of information literacy programs for assigned disciplines and will participate in research consultations and outreach activities to departments and research centres. Responsibilities include selection of information resources, collection management and evaluation in such fields as engineering, computer science, mathematics, kinesiology and science and technology studies. He/she will work individually and as part of a team to develop and provide reference services and information literacy programs to York's community of users taking full advantage of the online learning and web environments. She/he will also participate in project and committee work for York University Libraries and the University. Some evening and weekend work is required.

Steacie Science and Engineering Library is one of four libraries within York University Libraries. The Steacie Science and Engineering Library attracts a half million visitors a year and provides specialized resources, and reference and information literacy sessions to the science, engineering, and health programs of York University. The Library takes pride in its extensive information literacy program and online learning support initiatives. Four full-time librarians and seven full-time support staff are currently based in the Steacie Science & Engineering Library.

Qualifications:

  • An ALA-accredited MLS or equivalent.
  • Educational background or library experience relevant to the physical sciences, engineering, mathematics or computer science.
  • Knowledge of science and technology literature and reference resources, and awareness of emerging trends in scholarly communication.
  • Understanding of concepts, goals, and methods of information literacy instruction.
  • A potential for excellence in teaching and an ability to teach in a variety of settings and formats.
  • Demonstrated expertise with online content management platforms such as WordPress or LibGuides.
  • Strong client-centred service philosophy and evidence of professional initiative and leadership.
  • Ability to handle multiple responsibilities and projects concurrently.
  • Strong written and oral communication skills.
  • Ability to work effectively and collegially with a diversity of colleagues and clients.
  • Interest in research and professional development

This is a 3-year, contractually-limited appointment with the designation of Adjunct Librarian and is appropriate for a librarian with up to three years of post-MLS experience. Librarians and archivists at York University have academic status and are members of the York University Faculty Association bargaining unit (http://www.yufa.org/). Salary is commensurate with qualifications. The position is available from July 1, 2012. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.

York University is an Affirmative Action Employer. The Affirmative Action Program can be found on York's website at www.yorku.ca/acadjobs or a copy can be obtained by calling the affirmative action office at 416-736-5713. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and Permanent Residents will be given priority. Temporary entry for citizens of the U.S.A. and Mexico may apply per the provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

York University's resources include centres relating to gender equity, race and ethnic relations, sexual harassment, human rights, and wellness. York University encourages attitudes of respect and non-discrimination toward persons of all ethnic and religious groups, regardless of gender or sexual orientation.

Deadline for the submission of applications is March 30, 2012. Applications should include a covering letter that relates qualifications to the requirements of the position, a current curriculum vitae, and the names and contact information of three referees. Applications should be sent to:

Chair, Steacie Librarian Appointment Committee
York University Libraries
310 Scott Library
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3
Fax: 416-736-5451
Email: yulapps@yorku.ca

Applications should be sent by mail, or by email or fax with a hardcopy following.

Posting End Date: March 30, 2012

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Digital Assets Librarian, York University Libraries

Jan 16 2012 Published by under job, yorku

A terrific new opportunity at my institution. I'm not in the reporting department or on the search committee, but I'd be happy to answer general questions about York and the environment. My email is jdupuis at yorku dot ca.

The online job posting is here.

Position Rank: Full Time Tenure Stream - Assistant Librarian
Discipline/Field: Digital Assets Librarian
Home Faculty: Libraries
Home Department/Area/Division: Scott Library
Affiliation/Union: YUFA
Position Start Date: June 1, 2012

Digital Assets Librarian - York University Libraries

York University Libraries are seeking an innovative and self-motivated individual for the position of Digital Assets Librarian in Bibliographic Services.

York University is the leading interdisciplinary research and teaching university in Canada. York offers a modern, academic experience at the undergraduate and graduate level in Toronto - Canada's most international city. The third largest university in the country, York is host to a dynamic academic community of 62,000 students, faculty and staff, as well as 240,000 alumni worldwide. York's 10 Faculties and 28 research centres conduct ambitious, groundbreaking research that is interdisciplinary, cutting across traditional academic boundaries.

The Digital Assets Librarian will join a dynamic and growing team at York University Libraries, actively participating in research on campus, OCUL-Scholars Portal programs, and national and international digital initiatives. Working collaboratively in a dynamic service-oriented environment, the Digital Assets Librarian will play an integral role in the development of data curation, asset management and preservation strategies for York University Libraries. He/she will enable data discovery and retrieval, preserve and maintain data quality, provide for data re-use over time, and develop other value-added services.

The successful candidate will have a proven track record of managing large-scale projects involving stakeholders spanning multiple areas. The incumbent will ensure that best practices in emerging metadata standards are established and followed. This position will perform a key role in the creation of new data repository tools by gathering requirements and coordinating software development projects. He/she will play an advocacy and promotion role for open access to research data, best practices in data curation, and preservation practices on campus. The Digital Assets Librarian will work closely with colleagues, faculty, and staff to provide a wide range of curatorial services, including consulting on best practices for data documentation, developing appropriate data management plans, and coordinating the receipt of new data acquisitions. The Digital Assets Librarian responsibilities will include a liaison assignment with an academic department.

Additionally, the incumbent will possess: an enthusiastic and flexible attitude; the capacity to adapt to a changing environment; the ability to balance multiple responsibilities; demonstrated time management skills; and knowledge of emerging trends in scholarly communications and library and information technologies.

Qualifications:

  • MLS degree (or recognized equivalent) from an ALA-accredited program;
  • demonstrated large-scale project management expertise;
  • demonstrated experience with XML, applying metadata standards and schema, and controlled vocabularies;
  • demonstrated expertise with one or more metadata manipulation and scripting languages (e.g. XSLT, Perl, Python);
  • demonstrated applied web application development experience, including familiarity with development frameworks (e.g. Ruby on Rails, Django), and application programming language(s) such as Java, PHP, or others;
  • familiarity with semantic and linked data standards such as RDF and OWL;
  • familiarity with standards and best practices in data curation and preservation;
  • strong understanding of emerging trends and issues for research libraries in the areas of digital curation, digital preservation, scholarly communications and metadata;
  • excellent independent learning and problem-solving abilities;
  • excellent oral and written communication skills, ability to work independently and in collaboration with others;
  • evidence of a developing research portfolio

This is a continuing-stream (tenure track) appointment to be filled at the Assistant Librarian level and appropriate for a librarian with up to nine years of post-MLIS experience. Librarians and archivists at York University have academic status and are members of the York University Faculty Association bargaining unit (http://www.yufa.org/). Salary is commensurate with qualifications. The position is available from June 1, 2012. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.

York University is an Affirmative Action Employer. The Affirmative Action Program can be found on York's website at www.yorku.ca/acadjobs or a copy can be obtained by calling the affirmative action office at 416-736-5713. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and Permanent Residents will be given priority.

York University's resources include centres relating to gender equity, race and ethnic relations, sexual harassment, human rights, and wellness. York University encourages attitudes of respect and non-discrimination toward persons of all ethnic and religious groups, regardless of gender or sexual orientation.

Deadline for the submission of applications is March 15, 2012.

Applicants are directed to submit a covering letter outlining their relevant qualifications and experience, a current curriculum vitae, and the names and contact details of three referees. Applicants are also asked to have their referees submit written letters of recommendation directly under separate cover by mail, fax (or email with a mail copy following) before the application deadline. Applications should be sent to:

Chair, Digital Assets Librarian Appointment Committee
York University Libraries
310 Scott Library
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3
Fax: 416-736-5451
Email: yulapps@yorku.ca

Applications should be sent by mail, or by email or fax with a hardcopy following.

Posting End Date: March 15, 2012

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Around the Web: Resources on academic blogging and social media use

Dec 06 2011 Published by under blogging, faculty liaison, social media, yorku

I'm doing a short presentation tomorrow on blogging for researchers as part of a day-long communications workshop for faculty here at York. And since a few months back I created a reading list for a social media presentation for grad students, I thought I'd expand that list in this post and add some more specifically blogging-related resources.

Enjoy!

Feel free to add any suggestions in the comments.

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