Archive for the 'education' category

Support this Project: Science Wide Open: Children's Books about Women in Science

Every once in a while, I'm happy to use this blog to throw my support behind a worthy project. And there's nothing like children's science books about women in science!

Check out the Kickstarter for Science Wide Open: Children's Books about Women in Science, and consider joining me in helping this amazing project come to fruition.

Science Wide Open: Children's Books about Women in Science

When children ask questions, their whole world becomes their experiment

Kids ask a LOT of questions. The inquisitive star of Science Wide Open is no different! Her questions about how the world works guide each unique story, while the resulting narrative teaches some of the fundamentals of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.

What is Science Wide Open

Science Wide Open is a children's book series. This is a series that... First, explains and teaches some basic concepts in chemistry, biology and physics in simple and memorable terms by using the natural questions and curiosity of a young child. Second, does so by highlighting some of the mind blowing scientific advancements made by women scientists throughout history. The current series consists of three books:

  • Book One -- Women in Chemistry
  • Book Two -- Women in Biology
  • Book Three -- Women in Physics

Inside these books

Each book in the Science Wide Open series consists of more than 32 full color pages, featuring 4-5 female scientists of diverse time periods and backgrounds as well answering questions like:

  • What is DNA?
  • Why do things fall down?
  • What is an Atom?
  • What is a Cell?

The beautiful artwork is accurate to the history and science it represents. The text is fun to read and easy to understand, and there’s even a glossary for curious kids (and adults) who want to delve deeper into the science!

Instill a Sense of Wonder and Possibility

Science Wide Open makes science accessible for all. You don’t need a science background to enjoy these books, but you’ll still appreciate them if you do. The series weaves narration, history, and science together to celebrate the power of curiosity and resilience.

Why these stories matter

If asked for a list of famous women in science, most people would start and end with Marie Curie. The truth is that countless women have made astonishing contributions to science, but many of their stories have been obscured or downplayed.

This is not the future we want for our kids.

Science Wide Open...

  • Engages readers in the amazing science behind how the world works in terms kids can understand and enjoy.
  • Introduces female role models for aspiring young scientists of any gender.
  • Shares inspirational stories of women who have changed the world through their scientific discoveries.

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Around the Web: Ada Lovelace Day, Wikipedia & Women in Science

My library is hosting a Ada Lovelace Day event tomorrow (ok, a little late...). Continuing in a tradition of having Women in Science Wikipedia Edit-a-thons, we're hosting our own Wikipedia Women in Science Edit-a-thon!

I've been doing a fair bit of reading over the last couple of years about Wikipedia culture and especially how it relates to the under-representation of women both as editors and as subjects of articles. So I thought I'd share some of my readings here with all of you.

Of course, this list is in no way comprehensive or complete. I welcome suggestions for further readings in the comments, either on edit-a-thons, women in science, Wikipedia culture or any of the intersections of those topics.

 

About Wikipedia Edit-a-thons

 

About Wikipedia and Editor Culture More Generally

I'm working on a LibGuide for the event which I'll post here once I make it live.

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Around the Web: Everyone is angsty in higher ed, not just librarians

May 30 2013 Published by under acad lib future, around the web, education

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Around the Web: Access Copyright sues York University

Apr 16 2013 Published by under academia, Canada, education, yorku

Since I work at York University, I'm going to refrain from commenting on this lawsuit. However, as is my practice I'll be creating and maintaining a list of relevant articles and resources here to help me stay current on the matter.

I am not attempting to create a comprehensive list.

General

 

Some Related Items on Canadian Copyright from 2012 & 2013

 

Chronology & Background for Access Copyright/York University Lawsuit (including 2012 & Earlier)

 

As usual, if I've made any errors of if I've missed anything significant, please let me know in the comments or at jdupuis at yorku dot ca.

2 responses so far

Friday Fun: Welcome to My Massive Open Online Cult!

Apr 12 2013 Published by under education, friday fun, Uncategorized

McSweeny's is brilliant at skewering fads. And there is no bigger fad in higher education than Massive Open Online Courses. MOOCs, as they are known.

Now I'm not quibbling with whether or not MOOCs are an interesting and potentially extremely valuable addition to the landscape of higher education, because I think they are. What I find unfortunate is how completely so many in the general public/commentariat/tech guru class seem to have so thourougly fallen under the MOOC spell, seeing all their libertarian free market dreams coming true. Almost like a cult.

Without any further ado:

Welcome to My Massive Open Online Cult!

Leader Bio

I am an independent scholar and a committed father of thirty-eight beautiful children. My specialty is in neo-pagan fertility rites. Having joined my first cult at the age of twelve, I went on to found three successful movements in the contiguous United States and one in Sitka, Alaska. The Times-Picayune has repeatedly referenced my “purportedly magnetic personality” (print editions), and I was once a talking head on a Nancy Grace segment.

*snip*

Workload

There will be weekly reading responses, peer-reviewed initiations and various creative projects (e.g., devising a secret handshake). The message board will be moderated by only the most promising cult leaders-in-training, who will also be available for Live Chat sessions should your commitment to the cause waver. You will be expected to record your growing dissociation from normal life on a shared Google Doc file. For the final exam, you will be required to pass a multiple-choice test and film a (non-human) ritual sacrifice.

There will be no college credit given for successful completion of the course; however, all passing students will receive a certificate and a link to my really creepy, encrypted website. Although the course is free, you do have the option of emptying your bank account to a cult leader of your choice (preferably me) for extra credit.

It's very funny, especially the syllabus, so you should read the whole thing.

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Around the Web: Cool linky stuff for science undergrads (3)

Apr 09 2013 Published by under around the web, culture of science, education

I have a son who's currently a first year physics student. As you can imagine, I occasionally pass along a link or two to him pointing to stuff on the web I think he might find particularly interesting or useful. Thinking on that fact, I surmised that perhaps other science students might find those links interesting or useful as well. Hence, this series of posts here on the blog.

By necessity and circumstance, the items I've chosen will be influenced by my son's choice of major and my own interest in the usefulness of computational approaches to science and of social media for outreach and professional development.

The previous posts in this series are here and here.

Please feel free to add your own suggestions in the comments.

One response so far

Around the Web: Cool linky stuff for science undergrads

Mar 26 2013 Published by under around the web, culture of science, education

I have a son who's currently a first year physics student. As you can imagine, I occasionally pass along a link or two to him pointing to stuff on the web I think he might find particularly interesting or useful. Thinking on that fact, I surmised that perhaps other science students might find those links interesting or useful as well. Hence, this series of posts here on the blog.

By necessity and circumstance, the items I've chosen will be influenced by my son's choice of major and my own interest in computational approaches to science.

The previous post in this series is here.

3 responses so far

Around the Web: Cool stuff for undergrad science students

Mar 11 2013 Published by under academia, around the web, culture of science, education

I have a son who's currently a first year physics student. As you can imagine, I occasionally pass along a link or two to him pointing to stuff on the web I think he might find particularly interesting or useful. Thinking on that fact, I surmised that perhaps other science students might find those links interesting or useful as well.

By necessity and circumstance, the items I've chosen will be influenced by my son's choice of major and my own interest in computational approaches to science.

If you know of something that undergrad science students might be interested in, please feel free to add it in the comments.

3 responses so far

Scitech librarians take note: The Western Conference on Science Education

The biennial Western Conference on Science Education will be taking place this coming July 9–July 11, 2013.

I'm thinking very seriously of going and I think science/engineering librarians in general should consider doing so as well.

Here's how they describe it:

The biennial Western Conference for Science Education creates an ongoing organizational infrastructure that invites teaching and research faculty, librarians and other educational professionals, regardless of their experience level, to collaborate on the improvement of post-secondary Science education through the exchange of experience, innovation, ideas, and research in teaching and learning across disciplines.

Although situated in the context of Canadian higher education in Science, the Western Conference recognizes that fundamental issues in teaching and learning often transcend disciplinary, institutional, and national boundaries. Participation by colleagues working outside the country, or outside the traditional disciplines of Science, is welcome.

Specifically, the Western Conference for Science Education is designed to create and sustain an on-going organizational structure that:

  1. enhances a Science education community by enticing faculty and educational staff to venture out of their respective discipline-specific circles to meet, discuss, and collaborate with one another;
  2. promotes ongoing improvement in post-secondary Science education through support of a range of scholarly approaches to teaching and learning;
  3. contributes to the professional development of Science educators by providing access to educational leaders, resources, and training;
  4. promotes productive inter-relationships between educators and various private sector academic publishers, suppliers, technology providers etc;
  5. provides an avenue to share ideas, innovation, and research;
  6. ensures that Conference proceedings are archived and accessible.

Conferences are planned for every other year after 2013. On off-years, we encourage other colleagues, organizations and institutions to host synergistic events that benefit from, and in turn increase, the momentum created by the Western Conferences.

The call for proposals is here and the submission guidelines here.

The conference topic threads have a lot of scope for the kinds of work librarians do:

Thread A: Teaching and Learning Science
Thread B: Evaluation of Learning
Thread C: Curriculum
Thread D: Education Technologies and Innovative Resources
Thread E: Other

And the session formats leave a lot of leeway for interesting ways to pitch that work. In particular, the "Short & Tweet" format seems to have a lot of possibility for advocacy.

  • Workshops: Workshops are highly participatory hands-on 80 minute sessions allowing participants to come away with a product, tool, or skill.
  • Presentations: Presentations are 40 minute sessions providing the opportunity for presenters to engage with their peers in the form of a traditional paper, novel demonstration, provocative debate, or other creative formats. When appropriate, two complementary presentations will be paired.
  • Short and Tweets: This is an engaging 14.0 minute live presentation that will be summarized in 140 characters. Short and Tweets will be collected and presented in six-packs.
  • Posters: Posters are self-explanatory visual displays offered in a format that promotes informal dialogue between the poster’s author(s) and their peers. At least one of the poster's authors will be available for discussion during the Poster Session.

The Canadian Engineering Education Association annual conference (June 17-20) is another I'm considering for the spring/summer and I know that it's also a very good conference for engineering librarians.

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Around the Web: Open Access in the Humanities & Social Sciences, Top ed-tech trends of 2012, eBooks in libraries

Dec 31 2012 Published by under around the web, ebooks, education, open access

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