Best Science Books 2011: Discovery News

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Discovery News: A Little Light Reading: 2011 in Physics Books.

  • The Infinity Puzzle: Quantum Field Theory and the Hunt for an Orderly Universe by Frank Close
  • The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World by Edward Dolnick
  • About Time: Cosmology and Culture at the Twilight of the Big Bang by Adam Frank
  • The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos by Brian Greene
  • Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's Life in Science by Lawrence M. Krauss
  • The 4 Percent Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and the Race to Discover the Rest of Reality by Richard Panek
  • Knocking on Heaven's Door: How Physics and Scientific Thinking Illuminate the Universe and the Modern World by Lisa Randall
  • Physics on the Fringe: Smoke Rings, Circlons, and Alternative Theories of Everything by Margaret Wertheim

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: Sci Tech Watch

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Sci Tech Watch: My Favorite Books of 2011.

  • The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You by Eli Pariser
  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • Fire on the Horizon: The Untold Story of the Gulf Oil Disaster by Tom Shroder and John Konrad
  • Into the Forbidden Zone by William T. Vollmann

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: Russell Blackford, Stumbling Virtue, Men's Journal, Houston Chronicle

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

Russell Blackford

  • The Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven Pinker

Stumbling Virtue

  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer
  • Moby Duck: The True Story of 28,800 Bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, Including the Author, Who Went in Search of Them by Donovan Hohn
  • The Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard

Men's Journal

  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer

Houston Chronicle

  • Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain by David Eagleman

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: Mother Nature Network

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Mother Nature Network: Best green and environmental books of 2011.

  • The Best Science and Nature Writing of 2011 edited by Mary Roach
  • Once and Future Giants: What Ice Age Extinctions Tell Us About the Fate of Earth's Largest Mammals by Sharon Levy
  • The Beekeeper's Lament: How One Man and a Half a Billion Honeybees Help Feed America by Hannah Nordhaus
  • Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology by Alexis Madrigal
  • Listed: Dispatches from America's Endangered Species Act by Joe Roman
  • Homegrown and Handmade: A Practical Guide to More Self-Reliant Living by Deborah Niemann

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: Bachelors Degree Online, Devourer of Books, The Progressive, Bookriot

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

Bachelors Degree Online: The 20 Best Books of 2011 You Should Read Over Winter Break

  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer

Devourer of Books

  • Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution by Holly Tucker
  • Sex on Six Legs: Lessons on Life, Love, & Language From the Insect World by Marlene Zuk
  • A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor

The Progressive: 5 Favorite Books of 2011

  • Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie: A Tale of Love and Fallout by Laura Redniss

Bookriot: Best Books of 2011: The Superlatives

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: Booklist Online Editors' Choice

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Booklist Online Editors' Choice.

  • The Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine, and the Murder of a President By Candice Millard
  • Becoming Dr. Q: My Journey from Migrant Farm Worker to Brain Surgeon By Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa and Mim Eichler Rivas
  • Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature, and the Shaping of the American Nation By Andrea Wulf
  • The Book of Universes: Exploring the Limits of the Cosmos By John D. Barrow
  • Moby-Duck: The True Story of 28,000 Bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, Including the Author, Who Went in Search of Them By Donovan Hohn
  • A Planet of Viruses By Carl Zimmer
  • The Quantum Story: A History in 40 Moments By Jim Baggott
  • The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water By Charles Fishman
  • The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood By James Gleick
  • The Most Human Human: What Talking to Computers Teaches Us about What It Means to Be Alive By Brian Christian
  • The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement By David Brooks
  • The Atlas of Birds: Diversity, Behavior, and Conservation By Mike Unwin
  • Atlas of the Great Plains By Stephen J. Lavin and others
  • Encyclopedia of American Environmental History. 4v. Ed. by Kathleen A. Brosnan
  • Encyclopedia of Pollution. 2v. By Alexander E. Gates and Robert P. Blauvelt
  • Patrick Moore's Data Book of Astronomy. 2d ed. Ed. by Patrick Moore and Robin Rees

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: SteveReads, Richmond Times-Dispatch, Todd Sattersten, The Bygone Bureau

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:


Stevereads 2011 Best Books of the Year: Nonfiction!

  • The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick
  • Worm: The First Digital World War by Mark Bowden

Richmond Times-Dispatch: Jay Strafford's 10 favorite books of 2011

  • Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature, and the Shaping of the American Nation by Andrea Wulf
  • The Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard

Todd Sattersten: 11 Best Business Books of 2011

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Issacson
  • Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World by Jane McGonigal
  • The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water by Charles Fishman
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kanheman

The Bygone Bureau: Best Books of 2011

  • Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking by Nathan Myrhvold, Chris Young, and Maxime Bilet

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: The Verge

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: The Verge Booklist 2011.

  • Super Mario: How Nintendo Conquered America by Jeff Ryan
  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker by Kevin Mitnick and William L. Simon
  • Idea Man: A Memoir by the Cofounder of Microsoft by Paul Allen
  • World Wide Mind: The Coming Integration of Humanity, Machines, and the Internet by Michael Chorost
  • The God Species: Saving the Planet in the Age of Humans by Mark Lynas
  • In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives by Steven Levy

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: Coffee Theory, New Yorker, Early Word, Dan Curtis, Huffington Post

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

Coffee Theory: The 10 Best Books I Read in 2011

  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer

The New Yorker Favorite Books from 2011 & Malcolm Gladwell

  • Adventures in the Orgasmatron: How the Sexual Revolution Came to America by Christopher Turner
  • Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie: A Tale of Love and Fallout by Lauren Redniss

Early Words

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Dan Curtis: The Best Biography & Memoir Books of 2011

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • Bird Cloud: A Memoir by Annie Proulx

Huffington Post: 11 Best Books Of 2011

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: Readings, Seattle Times, Book Reporter, Chicago Tribune

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:


Readings Best Non-Fiction of 2011

  • The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson
  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Seattle Times 32 of the year's best books

  • Fire Season -- Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout by Philip Connors
  • Never Say Die: The Myth and Marketing of the New Old Age by Susan Jacoby
  • Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution by Holly Tucker
  • The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World by Daniel Yergin


Book Reporter Reviewers Pick Their Favorite Books of 2011

  • The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth: Popularity, Quirk Theory, and Why Outsiders Thrive After High School by Alexandra Robbins

Chicago Tribune

  • A More Perfect Heaven: How Copernicus Revolutionized the Cosmos by Dava Sobel
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.