Archive for the 'best science books 2016' category

Best Science Books 2016: Cosmos Top Illustrated Science Books

Jan 19 2017 Published by under best science books 2016, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014 and 2015.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, public health, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Cosmos Top Illustrated Science Books.

  • Story of Life: Evolution Illustrated by Katie Scott
  • Coloring the Universe: An Insider’s Look at Making Spectacular Images of Space by Travis A. Rector, Kimberly Kowal Arcand and Megan Watzke
  • Truly, Madly, Deeply by Ali Bin Thalith
  • Historium by Richard Wilkins and Jo Nelson
  • Professor Astro Cat's Atomic Adventure by Dr Dominic Walliman and Ben Newman
  • Map Stories: The Art of Discovery by Francisca Mattéoli

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before losing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

2 responses so far

Best Science Books 2016: New York Magazine Science Books We Loved This Year

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014 and 2015.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, public health, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Since we're in mid-January, I'll probably only be posting two or three more lists after this one, at most. Probably one more this week and maybe a couple next week. Enjoy it while it lasts!

Today's list is New York Magazine 5 Science Books We Loved This Year.

  • The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds by Michael Lewis
  • Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War by Mary Roach
  • Cure: A Journey into the Science of Mind Over Body by Jo Marchant
  • On Trails: An Exploration by Robert Moor
  • Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets by Luke Dittrich

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2016: Science News

Jan 11 2017 Published by under best science books 2016, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014 and 2015.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, public health, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Science News’ favorite books of 2016.

  • Lab Girl by Hope Jahren
  • The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars by Dava Sobel
  • The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? by Frans de Waal
  • Eruption: The Untold Story of Mount St. Helens by Steve Olson
  • Seven Skeletons: The Evolution of the World's Most Famous Human Fossils by Lydia Pyne
  • What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves by Benjamin K. Bergen

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2016: WIRED

Jan 09 2017 Published by under best science books 2016, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014 and 2015.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, public health, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is WIRED’s Required Science Reading From 2016.

  • Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets by Luke Dittrich
  • I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong
  • Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy by Cathy O’Neil
  • Water is for Fighting Over: and Other Myths about Water in the West by John Fleck
  • The Wasp That Brainwashed The Caterpillar: Evolution's Most Unbelievable Solutions to Life's Biggest Problems by Matt Simon

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2016: The Guardian

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014 and 2015.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, public health, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is The Guardian Robin McKie’s best science books of 2016, History, Nature.

  • The Life Project: The Extraordinary Story of Our Ordinary Lives by Helen Pearson
  • Timekeepers: How the World Became Obsessed With Time by Simon Garfield
  • A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes by Adam Rutherford
  • The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari
  • Reality Is Not What it Seems by Carlo Rovelli
  • A Farewell to Ice: A Report from the Arctic by Peter Wadhams
  • I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong
  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi
  • The Voices Within: The History and Science of How We Talk to Ourselves by Charles Fernyhough
  • Tide: The Science and Lore of the Greatest Force on Earth by Hugh Aldersey-Williams
  • Blitzed: Drugs in Nazi Germany by Norman Ohler
  • Being a Beast: Adventures Across the Species Divide by Charles Foster
  • The Ethical Carnivore: My Year Killing to Eat by Louise Gray
  • Orison for a Curlew: In Search for a bird on the edge of extinction by Horatio Clare
  • Shallow Seas by Peter J. Hayward
  • Falcons by Richard Sale
  • Slugs and Snails by Robert Cameron
  • The Most Perfect Thing: Inside (and Outside) a Bird's Egg by Tim Birkhead
  • The Nature of Autumn by Jim Crumley
  • Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter, each edited by Melissa Harrison
  • Arboreal: A Collection of New Woodland Writing edited by Adrian Cooper
  • A Tale of Trees: The Battle to Save Britain's Ancient Woodland by Derek Niemann
  • The Wood for the Trees by Richard Fortey
  • Knowing Your Place: Wildlife in Shingle Street by Jeremy Mynott
  • The Big Cat Man: An Autobiography by Jonathan Scott
  • No Way But Gentlenesse: A Memoir of How Kes, My Kestrel, Changed My Life by Richard Hines
  • A Kestrel for a Knave by Barry Hines
  • The Outrun by Amy Liptrot
  • Fingers in the Sparkle Jar: A Memoir by Chris Packham

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2016: Science Friday Best Science Books

Dec 20 2016 Published by under best science books 2016, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014 and 2015.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, public health, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Science Friday Best Science Books.

  • Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer Space by Janna Levin
  • The Polar Bear by Jenni Desmond
  • Time Travel: A History by James Gleick
  • The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It . . . Every Time by Maria Konnikova
  • Being a Dog: Following the Dog Into a World of Smell by Alexandra Horowitz
  • Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World by Rachel Ignotofsky
  • The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars by Dava Sobel
  • Felt Time: The Psychology of How We Perceive Time by Marc Wittmann, Erik Butler (Translator)
  • I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong
  • The Unnatural World: The Race to Remake Civilization in Earth's Newest Age by David Biello
  • Earth in Human Hands: Shaping Our Planet's Future by David Grinspoon
  • The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World by Oliver Morton
  • Spaceborne by Donald Pettit
  • The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself by Sean Carroll
  • Seven Brief Lessons on Physics by Carlo Rovelli
  • The Genius of Birds by Jennifer Ackerman
  • The Age of Em: Work, Love, and Life when Robots Rule the Earth by Robin Hanson

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2016: Brain Pickings The Greatest Science Books of 2016

Dec 15 2016 Published by under best science books 2016, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014 and 2015.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, public health, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is .

  • Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer Space by Janna Levin
  • Time Travel: A History by James Gleick
  • Felt Time: The Psychology of How We Perceive Time by Marc Wittmann, Erik Butler (Translator)
  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi
  • The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It . . . Every Time by Maria Konnikova
  • The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • The Polar Bear by Jenni Desmond
  • The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself by Sean Carroll
  • The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate―Discoveries from A Secret World by Peter Wohlleben
  • Being a Dog: Following the Dog Into a World of Smell by Alexandra Horowitz
  • I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong
  • Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly
  • The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars by Dava Sobel
  • Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World by Rachel Ignotofsky

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2016: Goodreads Choice Awards

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014 and 2015.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, public health, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Goodreads Choice Awards: Nonfiction, Memoir and Autobiography, History and Biography, Science and Technology.

  • The Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley
  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi
  • Lab Girl by Hope Jahren
  • Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars by Nathalia Holt
  • Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly
  • Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? by Frans de Waal
  • The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War by Mary Roach
  • The Genius of Birds by Jennifer Ackerman
  • The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself by Sean Carroll
  • Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets by Luke Dittrich
  • Idiot Brain: What Your Head Is Really Up To by Dean Burnett
  • Into the Magic Shop: A Neurosurgeon's Quest to Discover the Mysteries of the Brain and the Secrets of the Heart by James R. Doty
  • In a Different Key: The Story of Autism by John Donvan, Caren Zucker
  • Unseen City: The Majesty of Pigeons, the Discreet Charm of Snails & Other Wonders of the Urban Wilderness by Nathanael Johnson
  • On Trails: An Exploration by Robert Moor
  • Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions by Brian Christian, Tom Griffiths
  • Cure: A Journey into the Science of Mind Over Body by Jo Marchant
  • I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong
  • The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future by Kevin Kelly
  • Time Travel: A History by James Gleick
  • Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy by Cathy O'Neil
  • Baby Birds: An Artist Looks into the Nest by Julie Zickefoose
  • Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction by Mary Ellen Hannibal

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2016: The Economist Books of the Year 2016

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014 and 2015.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, public health, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is The Economist Books of the Year 2016.

  • I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong
  • The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • Patient HM: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets by Luke Dittrich
  • Cure: A Journey into the Science of Mind over Body by Jo Marchant
  • The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars by Dava Sobel

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2016: Library Journal Best Books 2016

Dec 06 2016 Published by under best science books 2016, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014 and 2015.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Library Journal Best Books 2016 and Nonfiction.

  • The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • The Industries of the Future by Alec Ross
  • How to Survive a Plague: The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS by David France
  • Gender Medicine: The Groundbreaking New Science of Gender- and Sex-Based Diagnosis and Treatment by Marek Glezerman
  • Snowball in a Blizzard: A Physician's Notes on Uncertainty in Medicine by Steven Hatch
  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi
  • Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? by Frans de Waal
  • Being a Dog: Following the Dog Into a World of Smell by Alexandra Horowitz
  • Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War by Mary Roach
  • The Lion in the Living Room: How House Cats Tamed Us and Took Over the World by Abigail Tucker
  • The Dragon Behind the Glass: A True Story of Power, Obsession, and the World’s Most Coveted Fish by Emily Voigt

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

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