Archive for the 'best science books 2015' category

Best Science Books 2015: Gizmodo's The Science Books We Loved Most in 2015

Jan 13 2016 Published by under best science books 2015, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And here we are in 2015!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Gizmodo's The Science Books We Loved Most in 2015.

  • H Is for Hawk by Helen MacDonald
  • The Hunt for Vulcan...And How Albert Einstein Destroyed a Planet, Discovered Relativity, and Deciphered the Universe by Thomas Levenson
  • Neurotribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity by Steve Silberman
  • Thing Explainer: Complicated Stuff in Simple Words by Randall Munroe
  • The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer by Sydney Padua
  • Spooky Action at a Distance: The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time--and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything by George Musser
  • A is For Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie by Kathryn Harkup
  • The Vital Question: Energy, Evolution, and the Origins of Complex Life by Nick Lane
  • Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe by Lisa Randall
  • Life on the Edge: The Coming of Age of Quantum Biology by Johnjoe Mcfadden and Jim Al-Khalili
  • The Invention of Nature: The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt, the Lost Hero of Science by Andrea Wulf
  • Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics by Richard Thaler

And check out my previous 2015 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

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Best Science Books 2015: Library Journal Best Books 2015 Core Nonfiction

Jan 12 2016 Published by under best science books 2015, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And here we are in 2015!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Library Journal Best Books 2015 Core Nonfiction.

  • The Death of Cancer: After Fifty Years on the Front Lines of Medicine, a Pioneering Oncologist Reveals Why the War on Cancer Is Winnable—and How We Can Get There by DeVita, Vincent T & Elizabeth DeVita-Raeburn
  • The Heart Healers: The Misfits, Mavericks, and Rebels Who Created the Greatest Medical Breakthrough of Our Lives by Forrester, James
  • Come as You Are: The Surprising New Science That Will Transform Your Sex Life by Nagoski, Emily
  • Bad Faith: When Religious Belief Undermines Modern Medicine by Offit, Paul A
  • Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and the Search for Justice in Science by Dreger, Alice
  • The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness by Montgomery, Sy
  • Resurrection Science: Conservation, De-Extinction, and the Precarious Future of Wild Things by O’Connor, M.R
  • NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity by Silberman, Steve
  • The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World by Wulf, Andrea

And check out my previous 2015 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2015: Science News' favorite books of 2015

Jan 10 2016 Published by under best science books 2015, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And here we are in 2015!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Science News' favorite books of 2015.

  • The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World by Andrea Wulf
  • The Reason for Flowers: Their History, Culture, Biology, and How They Change Our Lives by Stephen Buchmann
  • The Diet Myth: Why the Secret to Health and Weight Loss is Already in Your Gut by Tim Spector
  • Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved by Marcia Bartusiak
  • How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction by Beth Shapiro
  • The Invaders: How Humans and Their Dogs Drove Neanderthals to Extinction by Pat Shipman
  • The Science of Mom: A Research-Based Guide to Your Baby's First Year by Alice Green Callahan
  • Lesser Beasts: A Snout-to-Tail History of the Humble Pig by Mark Essig
  • Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death, and Brain Surgery by Henry Marsh
  • Infested: How the Bed Bug Infiltrated Our Bedrooms and Took Over the World by Brooke Borel
  • Rust: The Longest War by Jonathan Waldman
  • Scientific Babel: How Science Was Done Before and After Global English by Michael D. Gordin
  • A Beautiful Question: Finding Nature's Deep Design by Frank Wilczek

And check out my previous 2015 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2015: NBC News 12 Notable Tech and Science Books of 2015

Jan 02 2016 Published by under best science books 2015, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And here we are in 2015!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is NBC News 12 Notable Tech and Science Books of 2015.

  • On the Move: A Life by Oliver Sacks
  • The Man Who Wasn't There: Investigations into the Strange New Science of the Self by Anil Ananthaswam
  • Domesticated: Evolution in a Man-Made World by Richard C. Francis
  • Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe by Lisa Randal
  • The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific Revolution by David Wootton
  • The Hunt for Vulcan: . . . And How Albert Einstein Destroyed a Planet, Discovered Relativity, and Deciphered the Universe by Thomas Levenson
  • Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future by Ashlee Vance
  • Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future by Martin Ford
  • The Master Algorithm: How the Quest for the Ultimate Learning Machine Will Remake Our World by Pedro Domingos
  • Big Science: Ernest Lawrence and the Invention that Launched the Military-Industrial Complex by Michael Hiltzik
  • Leaving Orbit: Notes from the Last Days of American Spaceflight by Margaret Lazarus Dean
  • Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It by Marc Goodman

And check out my previous 2015 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2015: Goodreads Choice Awards: Best Science and Technology

Dec 21 2015 Published by under best science books 2015, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And here we are in 2015!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Goodreads Choice Awards: Best Science and Technology.

  • Beneath the Surface: Killer Whales, SeaWorld, and the Truth Beyond Blackfish by John Hargrove, Howard Chua-Eoan
  • Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science-and the World by Rachel Swaby
  • Voices in the Ocean: A Journey into the Wild and Haunting World of Dolphins by Susan Casey
  • Forensics: What Bugs, Burns, Prints, DNA and More Tell Us About Crime by Val McDermid
  • Come as You Are: The Surprising New Science that Will Transform Your Sex Life by Emily Nagoski
  • Elon Musk: Inventing the Future by Ashlee Vance
  • What Stands in a Storm: Three Days in the Worst Superstorm to Hit the South's Tornado Alley by Kim Cross
  • On the Move: A Life by Oliver Sacks
  • Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain–for Life by David Perlmutter
  • How Music Got Free: The End of an Industry, the Turn of the Century, and the Patient Zero of Piracy by Stephen Witt
  • Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel by Carl Safina
  • Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader by Brent Schlender
  • The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness by Sy Montgomery
  • The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity by Norman Doidge
  • Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World by Peter H. Diamandis
  • Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable, and What We Can Do About It by Marc Goodman
  • Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream by Joshua Davis
  • NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and The Future of Neurodiversity by Steve Silberman
  • Rain: A Natural and Cultural History by Cynthia Barnett

And check out my previous 2015 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2015: Science Friday

Dec 18 2015 Published by under best science books 2015, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And here we are in 2015!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Science Friday: The Best Science Books of 2015.

Their were two guests on the books of the year episode of Science Friday, Deborah Blum and Maria Popova. Popova's picks were already featured in the Brain Pickings post, so the items below are from Deborah Blum only.

  • H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald
  • The Hunt for Vulcan…And How Albert Einstein Destroyed a Planet, Discovered Relativity, and Deciphered the Universe by Thomas Levenson
  • The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness by Sy Montgomery
  • Plucked: A History of Hair Removal by Rebecca Herzig
  • Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science—and the World by Rachel Swaby
  • The Shift: One Nurse, Twelve Hours, Four Patients’ Lives by Theresa Brown, RN
  • Thing Explainer: Complicated Stuff in Simple Words by Randall Munroe
  • Rain: A Natural and Cultural History by Cynthia Barnett

And check out my previous 2015 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2015: Brain Pickings Best Science Books of 2015

Dec 15 2015 Published by under best science books 2015, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And here we are in 2015!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Brain Pickings Best Science Books of 2015.

  • On the Move: A Life by Oliver Sacks
  • The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World by Andrea Wulf
  • Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe by Lisa Randall
  • The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer by Sydney Padua
  • The Blue Whale by Jenni Desmond
  • The Physicist and the Philosopher: Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate That Changed Our Understanding of Time by Jimena Canales
    <li>What to Think About Machines That Think: Today's Leading Thinkers on the Age of Machine Intelligence edited by John Brockman

  • Thunder & Lightning: Weather Past, Present, Future by Lauren Redniss

And check out my previous 2015 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2015: The Guardian Best Books

Dec 14 2015 Published by under best science books 2015, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And here we are in 2015!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is The Guardian Best Science Books, Photography, Nature (selected).

  • Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis
  • Life's Greatest Secret: The Race to Crack the Genetic Code by Matthew Cobb
  • On the Move: A Life by Oliver Sacks
  • Atmosphere of Hope: Solutions to the Climate Crisis by Tim Flannery
  • The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World by Oliver Morton
  • Coastlines: The Story of Our Shore by Patrick Barkham
  • Find A Fallen Star : Regine Petersen by Natasha Christia, Regine Petersen
  • Undiscovered Owls: A Sound Approach Guide by Robb Magnus
  • Inglorious: Conflict in the Uplands by Mark Avery
  • What Nature Does For Britain by Tony Juniper
  • The Moth Snowstorm: Nature and Joy by Michael McCarthy
  • H Is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald

And check out my previous 2015 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2015: The Globe and Mail 100

Dec 06 2015 Published by under best science books 2015, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And here we are in 2015!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is The Globe and Mail 100.

  • Losing the Signal: The Spectacular Rise and Fall of BlackBerry by Jacquie McNish, Sean Silcoff
  • Trees on Mars: Our Obsession with the Future by Hal Niedzviecki
  • The Right to Be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet by Sheila Watt-cloutier
  • On the Move: A Life by Oliver Sacks
  • H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald
  • So You've Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson

And check out my previous 2015 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2015: The Washington Post Notable Nonfiction of 2015

Dec 02 2015 Published by under best science books 2015, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And here we are in 2015!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is The Washington Post Notable Nonfiction of 2015.

  • The Dark Net: Inside the Digital Underworld by Jamie Bartlett
  • Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death and Brain Surgery by Henry Marsh
  • The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science Is Still a Boys’ Club by Eileen Pollack
  • The Pentagon's Brain: An Uncensored History of DARPA, America’s Top-Secret Military Research Agency by Annie Jacobsen
  • Stoned: A Doctor’s Case for Medical Marijuana by David Casarett
  • The Wright Brothers by David McCullough

And check out my previous 2015 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

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