Archive for the 'best science books 2014' category

Best Science Books 2014: The Washington Post

Dec 08 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's lists are The Washington Post ten best books of 2014 and 50 notable works of nonfiction.

  • Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande
  • The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert
  • Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy, and the Power to Heal by Tom Shroder
  • The Birth of the Pill: How Four Crusaders Reinvented Sex and Launched a Revolution by Jonathan Eig
  • Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon by Kim Zetter
  • How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg
  • How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson
  • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson
  • In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette by Hampton Sides
  • Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space by Lynn Sherr
  • What Stays in Vegas: The World of Personal Data—Lifeblood of Big Business—and the End of Privacy as We Know It by Adam Tanner
  • War of the Whales: A True Story by Joshua Horwitz

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

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Best Science Books 2014: Physics World

Dec 05 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Physics World Top physics books for 2014.

  • Wizards, Aliens and Starships: Physics and Math in Fantasy and Science Fiction by Charles L Adler
  • Serving the Reich: the Struggle for the Soul of Physics Under Hitler by Philip Ball
  • Five Billion Years of Solitude: the Search for Life Among the Stars by Lee Billings
  • Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters by Kate Brown
  • Smashing Physics: Inside the World’s Biggest Experiment by Jon Butterworth
  • Sonic Wonderland: a Scientific Odyssey of Sound by Trevor Cox
  • The Perfect Theory: a Century of Geniuses and the Battle Over General Relativity by Pedro G Ferreira
  • Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World by Mark Miodownik
  • Einstein and the Quantum: The Quest of the Valiant Swabian by A. Douglas Stone
  • Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of Laki, the Volcano that Turned Eighteenth-century Europe Dark by Jeff Kanipe

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2014: Library Journal

Dec 04 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Library Journal Best Books of 2014.

  • The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert
  • The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind by Michio Kaku
  • The Monkey's Voyage: How Improbable Journeys Shaped the History of Life by Alan de Queiroz
  • Dr. Mutter's Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine by Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz
  • Infinitesimal: How a Dangerous Mathematical Theory Shaped the Modern World by Amir Alexander
  • In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette by Hampton Sides
  • No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the U.S. Surveillance State by Glenn Greenwald

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

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Best Science Books 2014: New York Times 100 Notable Books

Dec 03 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2014.

  • Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande
  • Geek Sublime: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty by Vikram Chandra
  • The Human Age: The World Shaped By Us by Diane Ackerman
  • The Invisible History of the Human Race: How DNA and History Shape Our Identities and Our Futures by Christine Kenneally
  • On Immunity: An Inoculation by Eula Biss
  • The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert
  • Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World by Mark Miodownik
  • This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate by Naomi Klein

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2014: Financial Times

Dec 02 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Financial Times Best books of 2014.

  • Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance by Julia Angwin
  • The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee
  • The Boom: How Fracking Ignited the American Energy Revolution and Changed the World by Russell Gold
  • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson
  • No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA and the Surveillance State by Glenn Greenwald
  • Life on the Edge: The Coming of Age of Quantum Biology by Jim Al-Khalili and Johnjoe McFadden
  • Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen by Philip Ball
  • Risk Savvy: How to Make Good Decisions by Gerd Gigerenzer
  • The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science by Armand Marie Leroi
  • A Rough Ride to the Future by James Lovelock
  • Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death and Brain Surgery by Henry Marsh

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2014: Brain Pickings

Dec 01 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Brain Pickings The Best Science Books of 2014.

  • The Accidental Universe: The World You Thought You Knew by Alan Lightman
  • The Human Age: The World Shaped By Us by Diane Ackerman
  • The Book of Trees: Visualizing Branches of Knowledge by Manuel Lima
  • The Meaning of Human Existence by E.O. Wilson
  • The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All-There-Is by Roberto Trotta
  • The Science of Shakespeare: A New Look at the Playwright’s Universe by Dan Falk
  • A Sting in the Tale: My Adventures with Bumblebees by Dave Goulson
  • The Universe: Leading Scientists Explore the Origin, Mysteries, and Future of the Cosmos edited by John Brockman
  • Neurocomic by Hana Ros & Matteo Farinella
  • The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons: The History of the Human Brain as Revealed by True Stories of Trauma, Madness, and Recovery by Sam Kean
  • What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Monroe
  • Nothing: Surprising Insights Everywhere from Zero to Oblivion by Jeremy Webb
  • 30 Days by Joanna Tilsley
  • Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One’s Looking) by Christian Rudder
  • Evolution: A Coloring Book by Annu Kilpeläinen

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2014: Amazon.ca Editors' Best Books

Nov 27 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list includes Best Books of the Year & Best Canadian Books of the Year.

  • On Immunity: An Inoculation by Eula Biss
  • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson
  • Kitten Clone: Inside Alcatel-Lucent by Douglas Coupland
  • Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One's Looking) by Christian Rudder

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2014: Amazon.com Top 100 Editors Picks

Nov 26 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is 2014 Best Books of the Year: The Top 100 in Print Format.

  • Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande
  • What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
  • A Deadly Wandering: A Tale of Tragedy and Redemption in the Age of Attention by Matt Richtel
  • War of the Whales: A True Story by J. Horwitz
  • No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the U.S. Surveillance State by Glenn Greenwald
  • The Oldest Living Things in the World by Rachel Sussman
  • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson
  • Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One's Looking) by Christian Rudder
  • Trapped Under the Sea: One Engineering Marvel, Five Men, and a Disaster Ten Miles Into the Darkness by Neil Swidey
  • Lives in Ruins: Archaeologists and the Seductive Lure of Human Rubble by Marilyn Johnson
  • Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes by Svante Pääbo

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

23 responses so far

Best Science Books 2014: Globe and Mail 100

Nov 25 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

The first list I'll be highlighting this year is the Globe and Mail's Globe 100.

  • The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We’ve Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
  • This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate by Naomi Klein
  • Circling the Midnight Sun: Culture and Change in the Invisible Arctic by James Raffan
  • The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age by Astra Taylor
  • Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One’s Looking) by Christian Rudde
  • The Sixth Extinction: An Unnnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert
  • No Place To Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the U.S. Surveillance State by Glenn Greenwald
  • Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande
  • On Immunity: An Innoculation by Eula Biss

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

No responses yet

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