Archive for the 'best science books 2014' category

Lane Anderson Awards: Finalists for the best Canadian science books written in 2014

Sep 09 2015 Published by under best science books 2014, Canada, science books

One of the real highlights for me every year is the late-summer announcement of the Lane Anderson Awards short list.

From their website here:

Today, we are excited to announce the finalists for the best Canadian science books written in 2014.

Our jury panels evaluated submissions in two categories – adult and young readers. They arrived at their shortlist after evaluating the relevance of each book’s content to the importance of science in today’s world, as well as the author’s ability to connect the topic to the interests of the general trade reader.

The winner in each category receives a $10,000 prize.

“The jury adjudicated science books on subjects as varied and topical as space exploration, fracking, and even underwater dinosaurs,” said Holly Doll, Award Manager for the Lane Anderson Award. “Canada has so many talented authors writing about science in today’s world, and the Lane Anderson Award is very pleased to celebrate their work.”

The shortlisted finalists for the 2014 Lane Anderson Award are as follows:

Adult Category

Bob McDonald
Canadian Spacewalkers: Hadfield, MacLean and Williams Remember the Ultimate High Adventure
Publisher: Douglas and McIntyre

Dr. Francois Reeves
Planet Heart: How an Unhealthy Environment Leads to Heart Disease
Publisher: Greystone Books

Stephen Leahy
Your Water Footprint: The Shocking Facts About How Much Water We Use to Make Everyday Products
Publisher: Firefly Books

 

Young Reader

L.E. Carmichael
Fuzzy Forensics: DNA Fingerprinting Gets Wild
Publisher: Ashby-BP

Daniel Loxton
Plesiosaur Peril (Tales of Prehistoric Life)
Publisher: Kids Can Press

Maria Birmingham
Tastes Like Music: 17 Quirks of the Brain and Body
Publisher: Owl Kids

Winners will be announced at a dinner in Toronto in late September.

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Lane Anderson Award for Canadian science books: Call for submissions

As long-time readers of this blog with know, I'm a huge supporter of science books. One of my definite soft spots is the annual Lane Anderson Award for the best Canadian science book in both adult and young adult categories. As such I'll point out that the submission deadline for the 2014 award is fast approaching. If you or anyone you know published a Canadian science book in 2014, please consider submitting it for consideration for the award.

The award website is here. Some of my previous posts about the award are here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
 
Please help us support science writers in Canada.
We hope you agree with us that science exploration is one of the
fundamental areas of our world today—
 
The Lane Anderson Award recognizes that research and applauds the
people who help make young readers and adults alike aware of the
continuing importance of science in our world today.

 

Selection Process

The annual Lane Anderson Award will honour two jury-selected books, adult and young reader, published in the field of science by Canadian-owned publishers, and authored by Canadians. The winner in each reader category will receive $10,000.

Two three-person jury panels drawn from the Canadian academic, publishing, creative and institutional fields will review submissions in the two reader categories.

Entries may deal with various aspects of science and technology, including health care, nature, and environmental issues.

  1. All entries must be published in English between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2014.
  2. All entries must have an ISBN and be available for sale in bookstores in Canada.
  3. The deadline for submissions is April 30, 2015.
  4. A collection of essays by one author is eligible if the essays are on a single theme, and if the work in its entirety has not been published elsewhere. A collection of essays by more than one author is not eligible.
  5. A work by two co-authors is acceptable, provided the whole work is integrated and coherent. In the case of winning co-authors, the prize money will be divided between them.
  6. Electronic books are eligible, contingent on the author being a permanent resident of Canada during the 2014 calendar year and the entry having been made generally available for public sale on a commercial basis during 2014.
  7. Non-eligible works include pamphlets, monographs, brochures, reference books, conference papers and subsequent or revised editions of books. Posthumously published works are also not eligible, nor are works of fiction.
  8. Short-listed authors are required to attend the awards ceremony in Toronto and, if declared the winner, to address the audience at that time.
  9. The rules for eligibility will be administered, applied, interpreted and may be revised from time to time at the discretion of the administrator of the Lane Anderson Award. The administrator's judgment on the application of the rules and the eligibility criteria is final.

The Lane Anderson Award
11 Redcastle Crescent,
Scarborough, ON, M1T 1V2

The submission form is here, email is laneandersonaward@gmail.com and website http://laneandersonaward.ca/submissions

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Best Science Books 2014: Kirkus Reviews

Jan 20 2015 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Kirkus Reviews.

  • The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us by Diane Ackerman
  • On Immunity: An Innoculation by Eula Biss
  • Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous by Gabriella Coleman
  • Trespassing on Einstein's Lawn: A Father, a Daughter, the Meaning of Nothing, and the Beginning of Everything by Amanda Gefter
  • Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein
  • The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World's Most Wanted Man by Luke Harding
  • Starlight Detectives: How Astronomers, Inventors, and Eccentrics Discovered the Modern Universe by Alan Hirshfeld
  • The Sea Inside by Philip Hoare
  • Internal Medicine: A Doctor's Stories by Terrence Holt
  • War of the Whales: A True Story by Joshua Horwitz
  • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson
  • How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson
  • The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert
  • The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science by Armand Marie Leroi
  • The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era by Craig Nelson
  • In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette by Hampton Sides
  • Pandora's DNA: Tracing the Breast Cancer Genes Through History, Science, and One Family Tree by Lizzie Stark
  • The Unpersuadables: Adventures with the Enemies of Science by Will Storr
  • Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made by Gaia Vince

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

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Best Science Books 2014: Backchannel Top Ten Tech Books

Jan 19 2015 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Backchannel Top 10 Tech Booksof 2014 part I and II.

  • The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee
  • The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age by Astra Taylor
  • Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World’s First Digital Weapon by Kim Zetter
  • Dataclysm: Who We Are When We Think No One’s Looking by Christian Rudder
  • Geek Sublime: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty by Vikram Chandra
  • It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens by danah boyd
  • The Glass Cage: Automation and Us by Nicholas Carr
  • Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance by Julia Angwin
  • The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers by Ben Horowitz
  • Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous by Gabriella Coleman

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

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Best Science Book 2014: Cocktail Party Physics

Jan 08 2015 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Cocktail Party Physics My Favorite Physics Books of 2014.

  • The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses and the Battle Over General Relativity by Pedro Ferreira
  • Trespassing on Einstein’s Lawn: A Father, a Daughter, the Meaning of Nothing, and the Beginning of Everything by Amanda Gefte
  • Stuff Matters: The Strange Stories of the Marvelous Materials that Shape Our Man-made World by Mark Miodownik
  • What If? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
  • The Science of Interstellar by Kip Thorne
  • The Accidental Universe: The World You Thought You Knew by Alan Lightman
  • The Mathematician’s Shiva by Stuart Rojstaczer
  • Sonic Wonderland: a Scientific Odyssey of Sound by Trevor Cox
  • The Science of Shakespeare: A New Look at the Playwright’s Universe by Dan Falk
  • Cosmigraphics by Michael Benson
  • Our Mathematical Universe: My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality by Max Tegmark
  • The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All-There-Is by Robert Trotta
  • Wizards, Aliens and Starships: Physics and Math in Fantasy and Science Fiction by Charles Adler

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2014: io9

Jan 06 2015 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is io9 The Best Science Books of 2014.

  • Me, Myself and Why: Searching for the Science of Self by Jennifer Ouellette
  • What If? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
  • Lives in Ruins: Archaeologists and the Seductive Lure of Human Rubble by Marilyn Johnson
  • Dr. Mütter's Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine by Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz
  • The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science by Armand Marie Leroi
  • Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon by Kim Zetter
  • Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande
  • The Knowledge: How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch by Lewis Dartnell
  • Dodging Extinction: Power, Food, Money and the Future of Life on Earth by Anthony Barnosky
  • The Coming Swarm: DDOS Actions, Hacktivism and Civil Disobedience on the Internet by Molly Sauter
  • Invisible History of the Human Race: How DNA and History Shape our Identities and Our Futures by Christine Kenneally
  • Oxygen: A Four Billion Year History by Donald Canfield
  • How Not to be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg
  • WTF, Evolution?! A Theory of Unintelligible Design by Mara Grunbaum
  • Cosmigraphics: Picturing Space Through Time by Michael Benson
  • The Oldest Living Things in the World by Rachel Sussman
  • You Are Here: Around the World in 92 Minutes by Chris Hadfield
  • The Art of Space: The History of Space Art, From the Earliest Visions to the Graphics of the Modern Era by Ron Miller

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2014: Science Friday

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Scifri – The Best Science Books of 2014.

  • The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis by Arthur Allen
  • On Immunity: An Innoculation by Eula Biss
  • The Glass Cage: Automation and Us by Nicholas Carr
  • Being Mortal by Atul Gawande
  • Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials that Shape Our Man-Made World by Mark Miodownik
  • Me, Myself, and Why: Searching for the Science of Self by Jennifer Ouellette
  • The Coming Swarm: DDOS Actions, Hacktivism, and Civil Disobedience on the Internet by Molly Sauter
  • Dr. Mutter's Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine by Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz
  • Dodging Extinction: Power, Food, Money, and the Future of Life on Earth by Anthony D. Barnosky
  • Oxygen: A Four Billion Year History by Donald E. Canfield
  • How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg
  • The Invisible History of the Human Race: How DNA and History Shape Our Identities and Our Futures by Christine Kenneally
  • What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
  • This Changes Everything by Naomi Klein

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

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Best Science Books 2014: Wired

Dec 18 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is Wired: The Best Science Books We Read in 2014.

  • Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande
  • The Book of Beetles: A Life-Size Guide to Six Hundred of Nature's Gems by Patrice Bouchard
  • Faster, Higher, Stronger: How Sports Science Is Creating a New Generation of Superathletes--and What We Can Learn from Them by Mark McClusky
  • Geek Sublime: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty by Vikram Chandra
  • Molecules: The Elements and the Architecture of Everything by Theodore Gray and Nick Mann
  • The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert
  • How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson
  • Great Myths of the Brain by Christian Jarrett
  • Spineless by Susan Middleton
  • Ebola: The Natural and Human History of a Deadly Virus by David Quammen
  • The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science by Armand Marie Leroi
  • Proof: The Science of Booze by Adam Rogers
  • Animal Madness: How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots, and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves by Laurel Braitman
  • The Public Domain Review: Selected Essays, 2011-2013

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2014: The Guardian

Dec 17 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is The Guardian Best Books of the Year Science, Biography, City Books, Nature, Science.

  • The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert
  • Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari
  • The Innovators by Walter Isaacson
  • Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Portfolio 24
  • Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death and Brain Surgery by Henry Marsh
  • Responsive City: Engaging Communities Through Data-Smart Governance by Stephen Goldsmith and Susan Crawford
  • The Passenger Pigeon by Errol Fuller
  • A Message from Martha: The Extinction of the Passenger Pigeon and its Relevance Today by Mark Avery
  • A Sparrowhawk's Lament: How British Breeding Birds of Prey Are Faring by David Cobham and Bruce Pearson
  • Urban Peregrines by Ed Drewitt
  • The Birds of London by Andrew Self
  • Grey Daggers and Minotaurs in Greenwich Park: Memories of a London Schoolboy Naturalist in the 1940s by John F. Burton and Susan England
  • Nature in Towns and Cities by David Goode
  • Herbaceous by Paul Evans
  • Claxton: Field Notes from a Small Planet by by Mark Cocker
  • My Year with Hares by Martin Hayward Smith
  • Meadowland: The Private Life of an English Field by John Lewis Stempel
  • Buzz in the Meadow by Dave Goulson
  • A Comprehensive Guide to Insects of Britain and Ireland by Paul D. Brock
  • A History of Birdwatching in 100 Objects by David Callahan
  • Shrewdunnit: The Nature Files by Conor Mark Jameson
  • Savannah Diaries by Brian Jackman
  • Handbook of the Mammals of the World - Volume 4: Sea Mammals Edited by Don E. Wilson, Russell A. Mittermeier
  • HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 1: Non-passerines by Josep del Hoyo, Nigel J. Collar, David A. Christie, Andrew Elliott, Lincoln D. C. Fishpool
  • The World of Birds by Jonathan Elphick
  • Cold Blood by Richard Kerridge
  • H Is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2014: NBC News

Dec 09 2014 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

And here we are in 2014!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is NBC News Brainy Reads: Top Science and Tech Books of 2014.

  • The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era by Craig Nelson
  • The Copernicus Complex: Our Cosmic Significance in a Universe of Planets and Probabilities by Caleb Scharf
  • Proof: The Science of Booze by Adam Rogers
  • Starlight Detectives: How Astronomers, Inventors, and Eccentrics Discovered the Modern Universe by Alan Hirshfeld
  • The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
  • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson

And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

Many of the lists I use use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

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