Archive for the 'best science books 2012' category

2012 Lane Anderson Award Shortlist: Celebrating the Best Science Writing in Canada

Aug 29 2013 Published by under best science books 2012, Canada, science books

One of the highlights of the year for me is the Lane Anderson Award shortlist announcement.

From their website:

The Lane Anderson Award honours the very best science writing in Canada today, both in the adult and young-reader categories. Each award will be determined on the relevance of its content to the importance of science in today’s world, and the author’s ability to connect the topic to the interests of the general trade reader.”

The annual Lane Anderson Award honours two jury-selected books, in the categories of adult and young-reader, published in the field of science, and written by a Canadian.

Which given my Canadianness and my very evident love of science books, and especially lists of science books and awards, is naturally something I'm very excited about.

Let's get to the award. From the press release I received from the organizers today:

Lane Anderson Award Shortlist

Celebrating the Best Science Writing in Canada

 

The six finalists competing for the 2012 Lane Anderson Award were announced today by Hollister Doll and Sharon Fitzhenry, directors of the Fitzhenry Family Foundation. The annual Lane Anderson Award honours two jury-selected books, in the categories of adult and young reader, published in the field of science, and written by a Canadian. The winner in each category will receive a prize of $10,000. Winners will be announced on 26th September.
 

The 2012 Lane Anderson Prize Adult Finalists:

Fatal Flaws by Jay Ingram (Harper Collins) Jay Ingram unties a complicated interweaving of biology, medicine, human tragedy, surprise and disbelief in the world of prions, and unravels some of history’s most stunning revelations about disease, the brain and infection. He was the host of Discovery Channel Canada’s Daily Planet from the first episode until June 2011. Prior to joining Discovery, Ingram hosted CBC Radio’s national science show, Quirks & Quarks.

The Universe Within by Neil Turok (Anansi) The most anticipated nonfiction book of the season, this year's Massey Lectures is a visionary look at the way the human mind can shape the future. Neil Turok is one of the world’s top physicists and founder of the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS). He is currently the Director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics.

Superbodies by Greg Wells (Harper Collins) Based on the wildly popular segments broadcast during the Vancouver Olympics, Superbodies explores how genetics and DNA, the brain, muscles, lungs, heart and blood work together in extreme conditions. Greg Wells, PhD, is a physiologist, researcher and professor of high-performance sport at the University of Toronto.
 

The 2012 Lane Anderson Prize Young Reader Finalists:

The Big Green Book of the Big Blue Sea by Helaine Becker (Kids Can Press) Based on the idea that knowledge is power, The Big Green Book of the Big Blue Sea shows how the ocean works and why this immense ecosystem needs our protection. Experiments using everyday materials help explain the scientific concepts. Helaine Becker is a bestselling writer of children’s fiction, nonfiction and verse.

Canada Recycles by Peter Cooke and Laura Suzuki (Scholastic Canada) Everyone knows that recycling our waste helps the environment, but do you know how? Canada Recycles looks at why people need to recycle and takes readers through the recycling process.

How to Raise Monarch Butterflies by Carol Pasternak (Firefly) With more than 50 unique, close-up photographs readers will learn about the life cycle of the Monarch and how to encourage populations in their own backyards. Carol Pasternak is a photographer, personal trainer and educator who raises Monarch butterflies with her family.

 

The Lane Anderson designation honours the maiden names of Robert Fitzhenry’s mother, Margaret Lane, and his wife, Hilda Anderson Fitzhenry. The Fitzhenry Family Foundation is a privately directed Canadian foundation established in 1987 by Canadian publisher Robert I. Fitzhenry (1918-2008). The Lane Anderson Award is administered by Christopher Alam, a partner at the law firm of Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP.

 

For further information, please contact:
Debby de Groot
MDG & Associates
Phone: (647) 295-2970
E-mail: debby@mdgassociates.com
www.laneanderson.ca

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Best Science Books 2012: The top books of the year!!!!!

Jan 28 2013 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Every year for the last several years I've collated and extracted the science books from all the various "best books of the year" lists in different mainstream media and various other outlets. I've done the same this year for books published in 2011! I can tell it's been popular among my readers from the hit stats I see for this blog and from the number of keyword searches on "best science books" or whatnot I see in my analytics program.

Way back in 2009, I started taking all the lists I could find and tallying up all the "votes" to see which books were mentioned the most times. An interesting exercise, to say the least! While the "winner" wasn't in any sense the best book of the year, it was certainly very revealing to see what books were getting all the attention and at least some sense of how well-received all the various books were compared to each other. Since what I tried in 2009 was so popular, I decided to do the same thing for 2010, 2011 and this year, 2012.

As with previous years, some of the lists have been from general/non-science media sources, in which case I've just extracted the science-related books. From science publications, I've included pretty well all of the mentioned titles.

For 2012, I looked at 69 different best of lists, spreading them among 46 of my blog posts. For 2011: 82 & 50; 2010: 60 & 33 and 2009: 46 & 32. The impressive number of lists I'm able to see every year is mostly mostly thanks to the amazing work gathering Year's Best Book lists over at the Largehearted Boy blog. Thanks!

I'm listing 22 books this year compared to 25 last year and 21 and 16 the first two years. Like last year, it takes four mentions in a best of list for a book to make into this top books of the year post.

Some notes/caveats, mostly similar to previous years:

  • These aren't in any way the "best" books of 2012, only the most popular books on year's best lists. For the most part, all the books mentioned will likely be at least decent since they've attracted a fair bit of critical attention. But, they are also almost certainly the books whose publishers had the biggest promotional budgets and sent out the most review copies. Susan Cain's Quiet was clearly one of the buzz books of 2012 and was very widely read and reviewed. It had a strong cross-over quality similar to the Henrietta Lacks bio from a few years ago. Like that book, it was the only sciencey book on a number of the lists I saw.
  • There are probably one or two straggler "best of" lists that haven't come out yet and I'm sure there are a bunch that I missed. Since I saw so many lists, I feel pretty confident that the list is fairly representative of reviewer sentiment. And, you know, this ain't exactly rocket science so my tallying may be imperfect in other ways.
  • Finally, in some of the longer mainstreams lists that I did see, I can't guarantee I consistently pulled in the same "edge cases" in to my science-y lists. There were numerous books mentioned twice or three times so one or two of those might have squeaked onto this list. Of course, I can't guarantee complete accuracy in any of the steps of the whole process. Sadly there is no small army of research assistants helping me compile these lists.
  • British, American and Canadian publication dates can mean that a 2012 British & Canadian book is a 2013 American book and vice versa. It happens.
  • There were 325 different books mentioned among the various lists. My list is in a Google Docs spreadsheet here. If you have any questions about the spreadsheet, just let me know.

In the list below, the number in the brackets is the number of different lists the book appeared on.

Enjoy -- and good reading!

  1. Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain (20)
  2. The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail — but Some Don't by Nate Silver (14)
  3. Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen (13)
  4. The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg (9)
  5. The Social Conquest of Earth by Edward O. Wilson (9)
  6. Hallucinations by Oliver Sacks (8)
  7. Turing's Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe by George Dyson (7)
  8. On a Farther Shore: The Life and Legacy of Rachel Carson, Author of Silent Spring by William Souder (6)
  9. Why Does the World Exist?: An Existential Detective Story by Jim Holt (6)
  10. Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness by Susannah Cahalan (6)
  11. The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation by Jon Gernter (6)
  12. Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History by Florence Williams (5)
  13. Bad Pharma: How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients by Ben Goldacre (5)
  14. The Particle at the End of the Universe: How the Hunt for the Higgs Boson Leads Us to the Edge of a New World by Sean M. Carroll (5)
  15. Connectome: How the Brain's Wiring Makes Us Who We Are by Sebastian Seung (4)
  16. The Revenge of Geography: What the Map Tells Us About Coming Conflicts and the Battle Against Fate by Robert D. Kaplan (4)
  17. God's Hotel: A Doctor, a Hospital, and a Pilgrimage to the Heart of Medicine by Victoria Sweet (4)
  18. Straphanger: Saving Our Cities and Ourselves from the Automobile by Taras Grescoe (4)
  19. The Universe Within: From Quantum to Cosmos by Neil Turok (4)
  20. Makers: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson (4)
  21. Wait: The Art and Science of Delay by Frank Partnoy (4)
  22. Before the Lights Go Out: Conquering the Energy Crisis Before It Conquers Us by Maggie Koerth-Baker (4)

And two honourary mentions:

I'm including the Strayed book because although it seems to be mostly a story of personal discovery, there seems to be some element of nature writing in the book. When I first saw it I didn't thing there was enough to qualify for listing. Without reading the book itself, I'm still pretty sure that's the case. But it received so many mentions in all the various lists I saw and was so widely praised, I thought I should mention it.

As for Trinity, it's a science graphic novel which was a personal favourite last year. It did receive a few mentions but not enough to to qualify. Hence, an honourary mention. It's my blog after all! And I hope to catch up a bit on my reviewing and get some thoughts up about the book here on the blog in the near future.

BTW, I really do appreciate the comments I've gotten both online and off about the usefulness of this bizarre project/obsession. It can be a bit of a slog sometimes as well as taking up a good bit of my available blogging energy during the late fall and sporadically during the winter, so the comments help keep me motivated.

6 responses so far

Best Science Books 2012: Teaching Biology, Part 3

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Top Books of 2012: History of Science, Paleontology , Zoolology.

  • Islam, Science, and the Challenge of History by Ahmad Dallal
  • Smoking Ears and Screaming Teeth: A Celebration of Scientific Eccentricity and Self-Experimentation by Trevor Norton
  • The Abacus and the Cross: The Story of the Pope Who Brought the Light of Science to the Dark Ages by
    Nancy Marie Brown

  • Science in the 20th Century and Beyond by Jon Agar
  • A History of Science in Society: From Philosophy to Utility, Second Edition by Lesley B. Cormack, Andrew Ede
  • Fear of Food: A History of Why We Worry about What We Eat by Harvey Levenstein
  • Inventing Chemistry: Herman Boerhaave and the Reform of the Chemical Arts by John C. Powers
  • War Against the Weak: Eugenics and America's Campaign to Create a Master Race, Expanded Edition by Edwin Black
  • Pathfinders: The Golden Age of Arabic Science by Al-Khalili
  • The Secrets of Alchemy by Lawrence M. Principe
  • The Evolution of Primate Societies by John C. Mitani, Josep Call, Peter M. Kappeler and Ryne A. Palombit
  • Living in a Dangerous Climate: Climate Change and Human Evolution by Renée Hetherington
  • Race, Monogamy, and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths about Human Nature by Agustin Fuentes
  • The Complete World of Human Evolution (Second Edition) by Chris Stringer and Peter Andrews
  • Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat by Bee Wilson
  • Human Biology: An Evolutionary and Biocultural Perspective by Sara Stinson, Barry Bogin and Dennis O'Rourke
  • Genetics of Original Sin: The Impact of Natural Selection on the Future of Humanity by Christian de Duve, Neil Patterson and Edward O. Wilson
  • Evo-Devo of Child Growth: Treatise on Child Growth and Human Evolution by Z. Hochberg
  • Origin of Our Species by Chris Stringer
  • Evolving Human Nutrition: Implications for Public Health by Stanley Ulijaszek, Neil Mann and Sarah Elton
  • The Dawn of the Deed: The Prehistoric Origins of Sex by John A. Long
  • Dinosaurs: A Concise Natural History by David E. Fastovsky and David B. Weishampel
  • Embryos in Deep Time: The Rock Record of Biological Development by Marcelo R. Sánchez
  • Rereading the Fossil Record: The Growth of Paleobiology as an Evolutionary Discipline by David Sepkoski
  • Piltdown Man and Other Hoaxes: A book about Lies, Legends, and the Search for the Missing Link by Jonathan Maxwell
  • Return to the Sea: The Life and Evolutionary Times of Marine Mammals by Annalisa Berta, James L. Sumich and Carl Buell
  • African Genesis: Perspectives on Hominin Revolution by Dr Sally C. Reynolds and Andrew Gallagher
  • A World of Insects: The Harvard University Press Reader by Ring T. Cardé, Vincent H. Resh, Bert Hölldobler and Edward O. Wilson
  • Animal Architects: Building and the Evolution of Intelligence by James L. Gould and Carol Grant Gould
  • Animal Eyes by Michael F. Land and Dan-Eric Nilsson
  • Horseshoe Crabs and Velvet Worms: The Story of the Animals and Plants That Time Has Left Behind by Richard Fortey
  • Learning From the Octopus: How Secrets from Nature Can Help Us Fight Terrorist Attacks, Natural Disasters, and Disease by Rafe Sagarin
  • How Not to Be Eaten: The Insects Fight Back by Dr. Gilbert Waldbauer and James Nardi
  • Walking Sideways: The Remarkable World of Crabs by Judith S. Weis

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

(I think this is the last one so I'll give it a day or two and then call it closed for purposes of the summary post. I'm hoping to have that by the end of the month.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2012: Cryptomundo

Jan 18 2013 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Cryptomundo The Top Cryptozoology Books of 2012.

  • The Beast Of Boggy Creek by Lyle Blackburn
  • The Bigfoot Filmography: Fictional and Documentary Appearances in Film and Television by David Coleman
  • The Encyclopaedia of New and Rediscovered Animals by Karl P.N. Shuker
  • Sasquatch in British Columbia by Christopher Murphy
  • The Untold Story of Champ: A Social History of America’s Loch Ness Monster by Robert E. Bartholomew
  • Sea Serpent Carcasses: Scotland – from The Stronsa Monster to Loch Ness by Glen Vaudrey
  • Monster Diary: On the Road in Search of Strange and Sinister Creatures by Nick Redfern
  • Investigating the Impossible: Sea-Serpents in the Air by Ulrich Magin
  • Bigfoot in Kentucky by BM Nunnelly
  • Strange Pennsylvania Monsters by Michael Newton
  • Monsters of West Virginia: Mysterious Creatures in the Mountain State by Rosemary Ellen Guiley
  • Monsters of Maryland: Mysterious Creatures in the Old Line State by Ed Okonowicz
  • Monsters of Virginia: Mysterious Creatures in the Old Dominion by L. B. Taylor Jr.
  • Real Wolfmen: True Encounters in Modern America by Linda S. Godfrey

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

(I think just one more then I'll stop adding new lists. I hope to have the summary post by the end of the month.)

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Best Science Books 2012: The Guardian

Jan 16 2013 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Christmas gifts 2012: the best science books, Best science books of 2012, Christmas gifts 2012: the best wildlife books.

  • The Particle at the End of the Universe: How the Hunt for the Higgs Boson Leads Us to the Edge of a New World by Sean M. Carroll
  • A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing by Lawrence M. Krauss
  • Ocean of Life: How Our Seas Are Changing by Callum Roberts
  • The Spark of Life: Electricity in the Human Body by Frances Ashcroft
  • Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen
  • The Geek Manifesto: Why Science Matters by Mark Henderson
  • This Is Improbable: Cheese String Theory, Magnetic Chickens and other WTF Research by Marc Abrahams
  • Beyond the Blue Horizon: How the Earliest Mariners Unlocked the Secrets of the Oceans by Brian Fagan
  • Wired for Culture: Origins of the Human Social Mind by Mark D. Pagel
  • Inside the Centre: The Life of J Robert Oppenheimer by Ray Monk
  • The Viral Storm: The Dawn of a New Pandemic Age by Nathan Wolfe
  • Wildlife Photographer of the Year Portfolio 22 by Rosamund Kidman Cox
  • Extinct Birds by Julian P Hume and Michael Walters
  • Extinct Boids (sic) by Ralph Steadman and Ceri Levy
  • Drawn from Paradise: The Discovery, Art and Natural History of the Birds of Paradise by David Attenborough and Errol Fuller
  • Fighting for Birds: 25 Years in Nature Conservation by Mark Avery
  • Silent Spring Revisited by Conor Mark Jameson
  • Wildlife in Trust: A Hundred Years of Nature Conservation by Tim Sands
  • Birds in a Cage: Warburg, Germany, 1941. Four P.O.W. birdwatchers. The unlikely beginnings of British wildlife conservation. by Derek Niemann
  • Mushrooms by Peter Marren
  • Field Guide to Micro-moths of Great Britain and Ireland by Phil Sterling
  • The Unfeathered Bird by Katrina van Grouw
  • Scotland by Peter Friend
  • Partridges by GR Potts and Francis Buner
  • Grasshoppers & Crickets by Ted Benton
  • Otter Country by Miriam Darlington
  • The Profit of Birding by Bryan Bland
  • A Patch Made in Heaven by Dominic Couzens
  • My Garden and Other Animals by Mike Dilger
  • Jewels beyond the Plough by Richard Jefferson and John Davis
  • Troubled Waters by Bruce Pearson
  • Bird Sense by Tim Birkhead

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

One response so far

Best Science Books 2012: ScienceGeek / Shabbeer Hassan

Jan 15 2013 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: ScienceGeek / Shabbeer Hassan Best Science Books of 2012.

  • Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells us About Morality by Patricia Churchland
  • The Origins of Sex: A History of the First Sexual Revolution by Faramerz Dabhoiwala
  • Wired for Culture: Origins of the Human Social Mind by Mark Pagel
  • The Viral Storm: The Dawn of a New Pandemic Age by Nathan Wolfe
  • Bad Pharma: How drug companies mislead doctors and harm patients by Ben Goldacre
  • Inside The Centre: The Life of J. Robert Oppenheimer by Ray Monk
  • Ignorance: How It Drives Science by Stuart Firestein
  • Connectome: How the brain’s wiring makes us who we are by Sebastian Seung
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  • Mortality by Christopher Hitchens

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

One response so far

Best Science Books 2012: Schaumberg Township District Library

Jan 15 2013 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Township District Library Best Science Books of 2012.

  • The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds with Common Birds by Zickefoose, Julie
  • Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness by Cahalan, Susannah
  • An Epidemic of Absence: A New Way of Understanding Allergies and Autoimmune Diseases by Velasquez-Manoff, Moises
  • Global Weirdness: Severe Storms, Deadly Heat Waves, Relentless Drought, Rising Seas, and the Weather of the Future by Climate Central
  • How We Do Harm: A Doctor Breaks Ranks about Being Sick in America by Brawley, Otis Webb
  • On a Farther Shore: The Life and Legacy of Rachel Carson by Souder, William
  • The Social Conquest of Earth by Wilson, Edward O.
  • The Spark of Life: Electricity in the Human Body by Ashcroft, Frances M.
  • Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by Quammen, David
  • Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder by Wortmann, Fletcher

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2012: Quill & Quire, Bloomberg, Washington Post and more

Jan 14 2013 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

 

Quill & Quire: Books of the Year Non-Fiction, Gift Guide

  • Out of the Blue: A Memoir of Workplace Depression, Recovery, Redemption and, Yes, Happiness by Jan Wong
  • My Leaky Body: Tales from the Gurney by Julie Devaney
  • Fatal Flaws: How a Misfolded Protein Baffled Scientists and Changed the Way We Look at the Brain by Jay Ingram
  • The Universe Within: From Quantum to Cosmos by Neil Turok

 

Bloomberg Gorman Skips Business, Jain Likes Faulks: Best Books of 2012

  • The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail — but Some Don't by Nate Silver
  • Antifragile: Things That Gain From Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Wait: The Useful Art of Procrastination by Frank Partnoy
  • The Social Conquest of Earth by Edward O. Wilson

 

Washington Post Best of 2012: 50 notable works of nonfiction & Graphic novels

  • The Social Conquest of Earth by Edward O. Wilson
  • Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me: A Graphic Memoir by Ellen Forney

 

Minneapolis Star Tribune Holiday books roundup: Biography & History

  • On a Farther Shore: The Life and Legacy of Rachel Carson by William Souder
  • The Ice Balloon: S.A. Andree and the Heroic Age of Arctic Exploration by Alec Wilkinson

 

Sunday Telegraph Books of the Year 2012

  • The Origins of Sex: A History of the First Sexual Revolution by Faramerz Dabhoiwala
  • Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain by David Eagleman

 

Fast Company The Best Business Books Of 2012

  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
  • The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail--but Some Don't by Nate Silver
  • The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg
  • Wait: The Art and Science of Delay by Frank Partnoy

 

Slate 2012 Books: Slate Staff Picks

  • Why Does the World Exist by Jim Holt

 

St. Louis Post-Dispatch Our 50 favorite books of 2012

  • Hallucinations by Oliver Sacks

 

The Kansas City Star Word power: The Star’s top 100 books of 2012

  • Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet by Andrew Blum

 

Christian Science Monitor 15 best books of 2012 – nonfiction

  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

 

The Chicago Tribune Printers Row picks: Our favorite books of 2012

  • Drop Dead Healthy: One Man's Humble Quest for Bodily Perfection by A.J. Jacobs
  • What A Plant Knows: A Field Guide to the Senses by Daniel Chamovitz

 

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

(Sweet mother of the FSM, I think I'm seeing the light at the end of the tunnel here. I'm hoping to be mostly done with these posts by the end of the week and the summary by the end of next week.)

One response so far

Best Science Books 2012: Mitch Joel, January Magazine, The Seattle Times and more

Jan 10 2013 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

 

Mitch Joel The best business books of 2012

  • Makers: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson
  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

 

January Magazine Best Books of 2012: Non-Fiction

  • Darwin’s Devices: What Evolving Robots Can Tell Us About the History of Life and the Future of Technology by John Long
  • Gifts of the Crow: How Perception, Emotion, and Thought Allow Smart Birds to Behave Like Humans by John Marzluff and Tony Angell
  • The Life of Super-Earths: How the Hunt for Alien Worlds and Artificial Cells Will Revolutionize Life on Our Planet by Dimitar Sasselov

 

The Seattle Times 25 best books of 2012

  • Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen

 

Liesl Shurtliff

  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

 

Sinistmer’s Best of 2012

  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

 

Eric Shanfield

  • The Making of the Atomic Bomb: 25th Anniversary Edition by Richard Rhodes
  • The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail — but Some Don't by Nate Silver

 

The Philosophers Magazine

  • Why Does the World Exist?: An Existential Detective Story by Jim Holt
  • Beyond Human Nature: How Culture and Experience Shape the Human Mind by Jesse Prinz

 

Chicago Center for Literature and Photography The Year in Books 2012: Best of the Best

  • Leaving Mundania: Inside the Transformative World of Live Action Role-Playing Games by Lizzie Stark
  • The Secret Life of the Grown-Up Brain: The Surprising Talents of the Middle-Aged Mind by Barbara Strauch

 

The Hindu 12 good reads from 2012

  • Like a Virgin: How Science is Redesigning the Rules of Sex by Aarathi Prasad
  • A History of the World in Twelve Maps by Jerry Brotton

 

Karen Edmisten Shockingly Clever Reading in 2012

  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

 

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

One response so far

Best Science Books 2012: The Hill Times

Jan 10 2013 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: The Hill Times' List of Top 100 Best Political, Government, Public policy and Canadian History Books in 2012

  • The Energy of Slavery: Oil and the New Servitude by Andrew Nikiforuk
  • The End of Growth: But Is That Bad? by Jeff Rubin
  • Save The Humans by Rob Stewart
  • Access to Medicines as a Human Right: Implications for Pharmaceutical Industry Responsibility edited by Lisa Forman and Jillian Clare Kohler
  • Canadians and the Natural Environment to the Twenty-First Century by Neil S. Forkey
  • Dreams & Due Diligence: Till and McCulloch’s Stem Cell Discovery and Legacy by Joe Sornberge
  • Making Medicare: New Perspectives on the History of Medicare in Canada edited by Gregory P. Marchildon
  • Our War on Ourselves: Rethinking Science, Technology, and Economic Growth by Willem H. Vanderburg
  • Phoenix: The Life of Norman Bethune by Roderick Stewart and Sharon Stewart
  • The Great Reversal: How We Let Technology Take Control of the Planet by David Edward Tabachnick
  • The Universe Within: From Quantum to Cosmos by Neil Turok
  • Three Bio-Realms: Biotechnology and the Governance of Food, Health, and Life in Canada by G. Bruce Doern and Michael J. Prince

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

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