Around the Apocalyptic Web: The sharing economy and getting paid for your work

I find the whole idea of a "sharing economy" where people barter and exchange and free up excess capacity in their own lives and situations to make others' lives a little easier and cheaper an interesting notion. And worthwhile. After all broadly speaking the open access and open source movements do partake of this same spirit. Libraries too, in that we pool the resources of a community to acquire stuff for the benefit of all the members, so that everyone can share the wealth.

But is there a dark side to sharing?

With the advent of companies like AirBnB and it's ilk not to mention the whole idea of the "reputation economy" sucking up the "gift economy" for it's own devices, well, let's just say I'm a bit more skeptical of the big money players than the little gals and guys.

So this Around the Web explores a long set of readings about more the new, more corporatized side of sharing, some pro, most con. After all, even the open access movement has it's share of big publishers and small startups diving in.

In no particular order:

Add your own favourite example of rich people asking not-so-rich-people to kick in to their profits in the comments.

Around the Web: 21 recent reports relevant to higher education, libraries and librarianship

I'm always interested in the present and future of libraries and higher education. There's a steady stream of reports from various organizations that are broadly relevant to the (mostly academic) library biz but they can be tough to keep track of. I thought I'd aggregate some of those here.

Of course I've very likely missed a few, so suggestions are welcome in the comments.

I've done a few similar posts recently here and here.

Around the Web: Science Policy!

Around the Web: A Creative Commons Guide to Sharing Your Science and more

Cool linky stuff for science undergrads (12): How to Read & Discuss a Book

I have a son who's currently a physics undergrad, just starting in third year. And another son who's starting first year philosophy. As you can imagine, I may occasionally pass along a link or two to them pointing to stuff on the web I think they might find particularly interesting or useful. Thinking on that fact, I surmised that perhaps other undergrad students might find those links interesting or useful as well. Hence, this series of posts here on the blog.

Since I'm a science librarian, the items I've chosen are mostly geared towards science undergrads (hence, the title of the series), but I hope many of them will be of broader interest.

The previous posts in this series are: 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1.

Please feel free to add your own suggestions in the comments.

Around the Apocalyptic Web: 7 Things Librarians Are Tired of Hearing and much, much more

Around the Apocalyptic Web: The Pitchforks Are Coming… For Us Plutocrats

Around the Web: MOOCs: Expectations and Reality and other recent reports

I'm always interested in the present and future of libraries. There's a steady stream of reports from various organizations that are broadly relevant to the (mostly academic) library biz but they can be tough to keep track of. I thought I'd aggregate some of those here. Of course I've very likely missed a few, so suggestions are welcome in the comments.

I've done similar compilations recently here and here.

  1. MOOCs: Expectations and Reality: Full Report
  2. Trends in Digital Scholarship Centers
  3. Sustaining the Digital Humanities
  4. Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Art Historians
  5. A Guide to the Best Revenue Models and Funding Sources for your Digital Resources
  6. Sustainability Implementation Toolkit
  7. A Scalable and Sustainable Approach to Open Access Publishing and Archiving for Humanities and Social Sciences
  8. White Paper: Reimagining the Georgia Tech Library: Defining the Technological Research Library for the 21st Century
  9. The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025
  10. AAU/ARL Prospectus for an Institutionally Funded First-book Subvention
  11. A Rational System for Funding Scholarly Monographs: A white paper prepared for the AAU-ARL Task Force on Scholarly Communications
  12. Students' experiences and expectations of the digital environment
  13. New York Times Innovation Report 2014
  14. Driving with data: A roadmap for evidence-based decision making in academic libraries
  15. Report of the Task Force on Doctoral Study in Modern Language and Literature (2014)
  16. Learned Society attitudes towards Open Access: Report on survey results
  17. The Survey of Library & Museum Digitization Projects, 2014 Edition (Not a free report)

Around the Web: Your university is definitely paying too much for journals

There's been a lot around the intertubes the last few months about journal pricing and who pays what and why and reactions all around. I thought I'd gather a bit of that here for posterity, starting with the Timothy Gowers post on the UK Elsevier Big Deal numbers up to the most recent item in PNAS about US numbers. In both cases, they authors dug up the numbers using Freedom of Information requests to the various institutions.

Needless to say, I'd love to see these kinds of numbers for Canada and if anyone out there is interested in working on such a project I'd love to hear from you.

The title of this post is inspired by this one.

There's obviously much more about all these topics out there, so any other links that readers might suggest are welcome in the comments.

Cool linky stuff for science undergrads (11): You Are Not a Digital Native: Privacy in the Age of the Internet

I have a son who's currently a physics undergrad. As you can imagine, I occasionally pass along a link or two to him pointing to stuff on the web I think he might find particularly interesting or useful. Thinking on that fact, I surmised that perhaps other science students might find those links interesting or useful as well. Hence, this series of posts here on the blog.

By necessity and circumstance, the items I've chosen will be influenced by my son's choice of major and my own interest in the usefulness of computational approaches to science and of social media for outreach and professional development.

The previous posts in this series are: 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1.

Please feel free to add your own suggestions in the comments.