Best Science Books 2017: New York Times Notable Books

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

And here we are in 2016!

As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, public health, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

Today's list is from The New York Times.

  • The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan
  • The Evolution of Beauty: How Darwin's Forgotten Theory of Mate Choice Shapes the Animal World - and Us by Richard O. Prum
  • The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars by Dava Sobel
  • The Gulf: The Making of An American Sea by Jack E. Davis
  • To Siri with Love: A Mother, Her Autistic Son, and the Kindness of Machines by Judith Newman
  • The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story by Douglas Preston
  • World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech by Franklin Foer

And check out my previous 2016 lists here!

You can also check out my appearances on the Science for the People Gifts for Nerds podcasts for the last few years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

(Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project a couple of years ago and never got around to the end of year summary since then. Before loosing steam, I ended up featuring dozens and dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

One response so far

  • Emma Evans says:

    I found 'World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech' to be a fascinating read so far. It has raised my awareness to a number of important threats. I can't wait to finish, but I find myself getting lost in thought on the subject matter.

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