Archive for: January, 2015

The Canadian War on Science: The #Altmetrics impact of a science policy blog post

On May 20th, 2013 I published my most popular post ever. It was The Canadian War on Science: A long, unexaggerated, devastating chronological indictment. In it, I chronicled at some considerable length the various anti-science measures by the current Canadian Conservative government. The chronological aspect was particularly interesting as you could see the ramping up since the 2011 election where the Conservatives won a majority government after two consecutive minority Conservative governments. The post is my most popular by an of magnitude, with around 10 times more page views that the next most popular over a similar time frame. It is two orders of magnitude more popular that an average popular post, which is in the upper 100s.

I've updated the original post three times, with separate posts for new items twice, here and here.

I've done an altmetrics post before where I brought together what I'd discovered about that War on Science post's impact.

This is what I had to say about the rationale for tracking the impact of that original post, which still holds true.

As an exercise in alt-metrics, I thought I would share some of the reactions and impact this post has generated. It’s certainly been a bit of a ride for me. I have to admit to being very pleased with the reaction. So much so, it’s gotten me to think more deeply about this slightly unhinged chronological listing thing that I do and perhaps it’s relationship to higher principles in librarianship. Maybe it’s a thing. More on this in the weeks and months to come as I further process and think about this particular activity and how it manifests in my practice of librarianship.

But perhaps the most compelling reason to do this post is very simple. To demonstrate that a blog post can raise awareness, that it can have some kind of impact in the real world, that it can be a lightning rod for participation and a space to pool the collective intelligence of the wider community to increase everyone’s knowledge.

I've also posted a bit about what the post means in the real world, how it's used and perhaps some information literacy implications of my extended project on Canadian science policy.

This new post you are reading now brings the altmetrics data about that post up to date. The main reason I'm doing so is that I'm giving a presentation about altmetrics on January 29th, 2015 at the Ontario Library Association Super Conference on altmetrics using my War on Science post as a case study.

Here's the session description:

802F Altmetrics in Action: Documenting Cuts to Federal Government Science: An Altmetrics Case Study

The gold standard for measuring scholarly impact is journal article citations. In the online environment we can expand both the conception of scholarly output and how we measure their impact. Blog posts, downloads, page views, comments on blogs, Twitter or Reddit or Stumpleupon mentions, Facebook likes, Television, radio or newspaper interviews, online engagement from political leaders, speaking invitations: all are non-traditional measures of scholarly impact. This session will use a case study to explore the pros & cons of the new Altmetrics movement, taking a blog post documenting recent cuts in federal government science and analysing the various kinds of impact it has had beyond academia.

  1. Understand what Altmetrics are
  2. Understand what some pros and cons are of using Altmetrics to measure research impact
  3. Ways that academic librarians can use altmetrics to engage their campus communities.

I'll post the slides here on the blog after the conference, probably next week.

I have an altmetrics reading list that I've compiled for the presentation here.

 
 

The metrics that follow are as at January 27, 2015. I've included a few based on the impact of a post I did on the crisis at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans where I thought it was a bit hard to tease apart the impact of that post from the original post.

I will also note that I personally haven't mentioned my post on any media sites or discussion forums nor have I encouraged anyone to do so on my behalf. No self citation is involved.

 
 

Various Measures (Twitter, Facebook, etc)

Most of these measures are likely undercounted as not everything shows up in track backs, stats programs or Google searches. For mentions in comments sections or discussion forums this is doubly the case and for those I haven't been explicitly paying attention as long to catch them as they happen.

  • Mentions on about 387 Facebook pages, ie. Occupy Calgary.
  • 71,429 page views (using Google Analytics)
  • 106 links/mentions from blogs, website, etc(see below)
  • 9 Mentions in Books, Reports, Scholarly Articles and Presentations
  • 22 Total or Partial Reposting of List
  • 19 Mentions in Comments of Blog or Media Site
  • 19 Mentions in Discussion Forums, Chats, etc
  • 210 comments or trackbacks on the blog post itself
  • 15,000 (approx) Facebook likes
  • 2913 (approx) Twitter mentions
  • 199 Google+ +1's (likely undercounted. Prev post had higher number (255))

 
 

Blog or Website Link

 
 

Mentions in Books, Reports, Scholarly Articles and Presentations

 
 

Total or Partial Reposting of List (Most neither by permission nor attribution)

 
 

Mentions in Comments of Blog or Media Site (Permalinks to individual comments are not always available or particularly reliable)

 
 

Mentions in Discussion Forums, Chats, etc. (Very partial) (Various such as Reddit, Metafilter, etc.)

  • May 2013. The Canadian Government's War On Science / Slashdot
  • May 2013. The Canadian War on Science: A long, unexaggerated, devastating chronological indictment / Reddit
  • May 2013. The Canadian War on Science: A long, unexaggerated, devastating chronological indictment / Reddit
  • May 2013. The Canadian War on Science: A long, unexaggerated, devastating chronological indictment / Reddit
  • May 2013. The Canadian War on Science: A long, unexaggerated, devastating chronological indictment / Newsana
  • May 2013. Meetup.com
  • Jun 2013. This is what USA “Free Market” principles look like / Center for Inquiry forum
  • Jul 2013. Canadian Government War on Science / Freedictionary.com forum
  • Jan 2014. Harper's War on Science Gets Uglier / Metafilter
  • Jan 2014. Neil Young Facebook page
  • Jan 2014. Le Ministre de l'au-delà / Straight Dope forum
  • Jan 2014. William Gibson message board
  • Jan 2014. Is the Harper Government actually waging a war on science / Reddit
  • Feb 2014. Tar Sands Toxins with Keystone XL Link Underestimated... / Reddit
  • Feb 2014. What is the most embarrassing fact about your country ? / Reddit
  • Feb 2014. Is there some who is hated by the general public in your country / your country's no 1 public enemy ? (crime, cabinet) / City-Data forum
  • Apr 2014. Harper removing North Pacific Humpback whales from list of ‘threatened’ species because of pipeline. / Reddit
  • Apr 2014. Newly released federal documents show Tories have been thwarting scientists' efforts to keep Canadians informed on Arctic ice levels / Reddit
  • May 2014. America dumbs down / Reddit
  • Jun 2014. Calgary Puck forum
  • Jun 2014. Why does everyone on Reddit seem to hate the conservative party? / Reddit
  • Aug 2014. Canada and the governments war on Science / Reddit
  • Oct 2014. "Most scientists who work for the Canadian government are not adequately protected from political interference or assured of being able to speak freely and openly about their work" / Reddit
  • Oct 2014. Harper is "flirting with fascism" with "nefarious scheme": CTV Don Martin / Reddit
  • Oct 2014. Government exploits attacks on military to push security agenda, Greenwald says / Reddit
  • Oct 2014. Above Top Secret Forum
  • Nov 2014. The Chill in Canada's Climate Science: A CJFE Live Chat / Canadian Journalists for Free Expression
  • Dec 2014. Canadian government continues valiant fight in the war against science / Metafilter
  • Jan 2015. Stephen Harper continues to make Canada into an international environmental pariah / Reddit
  • Jan 2015. Calgary Puck forum

     
     

    Miscellaneous Links

     
     

     
     

    Real World Impacts (Contacts with politicians, published media interviews, media backgrounder interviews, invitations to speak, invitations to participate)

     
     

    Government of Canada Domains that Read Post (Estimates based on Google Analytics sample)

    • ec.gc.ca
    • agr.gc.ca
    • dnd.ca
    • dfo-mpo.gc.ca
    • nrcan.gc.ca
    • ic.gc.ca
    • pwgsc.gc.ca
    • cbc.ca
    • asc-csa.gc.ca
    • nserc.ca
    • cic.gc.ca
    • nrc.gc.ca
    • parl.gc.ca
    • cra-arc.gc.ca
    • dfait-maeci.gc.ca
    • lac-bac.gc.ca
    • oag-bvg.gc.ca

     
     

    Top referrer websites (Estimates based on Google Analytics sample)

    • Facebook: 36.07%
    • Direct: 22.17%
    • Slashdot: 17.23%
    • Twitter: 7.30%
    • Boing Boing: 5.80%
    • StumbleUpon: 4.72%
    • Google: 1.88%
    • Reddit: 1.40%
    • Slate: 1.05%
  • No responses yet

    Around the Web: An altmetrics reading list

    I'm doing a presentation at this week's Ontario Library Association Super Conference on a case study of my Canadian War on Science work from an altmetrics perspective. In other words, looking at non-traditional ways of evaluating the scholarly and "real world" impact of a piece of research. Of course, in this case, the research output under examination is itself kind of non-traditional, but that just makes it more fun.

    The Canadian War on Science post I'm using as the case study is here.

    Here's the session description:

    802F Altmetrics in Action: Documenting Cuts to Federal Government Science: An Altmetrics Case Study

    The gold standard for measuring scholarly impact is journal article citations. In the online environment we can expand both the conception of scholarly output and how we measure their impact. Blog posts, downloads, page views, comments on blogs, Twitter or Reddit or Stumpleupon mentions, Facebook likes, Television, radio or newspaper interviews, online engagement from political leaders, speaking invitations: all are non-traditional measures of scholarly impact. This session will use a case study to explore the pros & cons of the new Altmetrics movement, taking a blog post documenting recent cuts in federal government science and analysing the various kinds of impact it has had beyond academia.

    1. Understand what Altmetrics are
    2. Understand what some pros and cons are of using Altmetrics to measure research impact
    3. Ways that academic librarians can use altmetrics to engage their campus communities.

    Not surprisingly, I've been reading up on altmetrics and associated issues. Since it's something I already know a fair bit about, my reading hasn't perhaps been as systematic as it might be...but I still though it would be broadly helpful to share some of what I've been exploring.

    Enjoy!

    Some companies & organizations involved:

    And please do feel free to add any relevant items that I've missed in the comments.

    One response so far

    Best Science Books 2014: Kirkus Reviews

    Jan 20 2015 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

    As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

    And here we are in 2014!

    As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

    Today's list is Kirkus Reviews.

    • The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us by Diane Ackerman
    • On Immunity: An Innoculation by Eula Biss
    • Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous by Gabriella Coleman
    • Trespassing on Einstein's Lawn: A Father, a Daughter, the Meaning of Nothing, and the Beginning of Everything by Amanda Gefter
    • Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein
    • The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World's Most Wanted Man by Luke Harding
    • Starlight Detectives: How Astronomers, Inventors, and Eccentrics Discovered the Modern Universe by Alan Hirshfeld
    • The Sea Inside by Philip Hoare
    • Internal Medicine: A Doctor's Stories by Terrence Holt
    • War of the Whales: A True Story by Joshua Horwitz
    • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson
    • How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson
    • The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert
    • The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science by Armand Marie Leroi
    • The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era by Craig Nelson
    • In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette by Hampton Sides
    • Pandora's DNA: Tracing the Breast Cancer Genes Through History, Science, and One Family Tree by Lizzie Stark
    • The Unpersuadables: Adventures with the Enemies of Science by Will Storr
    • Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made by Gaia Vince

    And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

    Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

    (Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

    No responses yet

    Best Science Books 2014: Backchannel Top Ten Tech Books

    Jan 19 2015 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

    As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

    And here we are in 2014!

    As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

    Today's list is Backchannel Top 10 Tech Booksof 2014 part I and II.

    • The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee
    • The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age by Astra Taylor
    • Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World’s First Digital Weapon by Kim Zetter
    • Dataclysm: Who We Are When We Think No One’s Looking by Christian Rudder
    • Geek Sublime: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty by Vikram Chandra
    • It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens by danah boyd
    • The Glass Cage: Automation and Us by Nicholas Carr
    • Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance by Julia Angwin
    • The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers by Ben Horowitz
    • Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous by Gabriella Coleman

    And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

    Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

    (Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

    No responses yet

    Best Science Book 2014: Cocktail Party Physics

    Jan 08 2015 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

    As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

    And here we are in 2014!

    As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

    Today's list is Cocktail Party Physics My Favorite Physics Books of 2014.

    • The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses and the Battle Over General Relativity by Pedro Ferreira
    • Trespassing on Einstein’s Lawn: A Father, a Daughter, the Meaning of Nothing, and the Beginning of Everything by Amanda Gefte
    • Stuff Matters: The Strange Stories of the Marvelous Materials that Shape Our Man-made World by Mark Miodownik
    • What If? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
    • The Science of Interstellar by Kip Thorne
    • The Accidental Universe: The World You Thought You Knew by Alan Lightman
    • The Mathematician’s Shiva by Stuart Rojstaczer
    • Sonic Wonderland: a Scientific Odyssey of Sound by Trevor Cox
    • The Science of Shakespeare: A New Look at the Playwright’s Universe by Dan Falk
    • Cosmigraphics by Michael Benson
    • Our Mathematical Universe: My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality by Max Tegmark
    • The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All-There-Is by Robert Trotta
    • Wizards, Aliens and Starships: Physics and Math in Fantasy and Science Fiction by Charles Adler

    And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

    Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

    (Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

    One response so far

    The Canadian War on Science: So because John Dupuis from York University says so I'm just supposed to believe it?

    Jan 07 2015 Published by under Canada, Canadian war on science, open access, Politics

    Think of this as a combination 2014 recap and 2015 resolutions post. Neither of which I really planned to do after doing recaps for the last couple of years. Two years ago, 2013, was very clearly a year I was more obsessed than usual with advocacy around the current Canadian government's treatment of science and information. The year before that, 2012, was a year I was very clearly more obsessed than usual with open access advocacy.

    This past year, 2014, was both a relatively light blogging year and a year when my twin obsessions from 2012 and 2013 seemed about tied. So I more or less decided to not bother with a "best of" post and just head into 2015 most likely continuing that twin obsession, probably at similar intensities. After all, we are expecting the Tri-Agency open access policy this year as well as a federal election.

    But then I saw this. And I knew I had to post something. But what? Rather than something backwards looking, how about a promise to myself for 2015?

    That's the ticket!

    So what's the promise, you ask?

    But first, let's deal with the bizarre little bit I found. Since my big War on Science Chronology post from May 2013 I've been tracking, alt-metrics-style, the impact that post has had. Hits, quotes, repostings, and the like as well as writing or presenting opportunities that have come my way due to the work I did there. As well, there have been media interviews and a whole bunch of other very cool things that have happened. I took a first stab shortly after the post was published when the impact spiked. I'll be updating that post and talking about what I find at the upcoming Ontario Library Association Super Conference.

    And part of those preparations is tracking more recent mentions of the 2013 post, usually by spotting hits in my hit tracking software.

    One of the most recent mentions is in the comments on a post on the CBC News site, Conservatives quietly nominate 60 per cent of their 2015 slate of candidates. It's actually quite common for people to mention my post in the comments sections of news sites or discussion forums. Believe it or not.

    Anyways, this particular example starts fairly normally, part of a comment thread where people are discussing the various anti-whatever policies of the conservatives.

    caring canuck

    @inuk of the north wrote - "Fascism is a term fashionably tossed around in some circles. Talk to someone who lived under a fascist government and you'll be embarassed at your terrible lack of knowledge and sensitivity."
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Talk about "terrible lack of knowledge and sensitivity." The vast majority of Canadians are becoming all to familiar with the - "Early Warning Signs of Fascism" - as exemplified by the Harper government. Canadian Veterans didn't fight and die to oppose fascism only to have it rear it's ugly head in this country

    - Powerful and continuing nationalism
    - Disdain for human rights
    - Identification of enemies/scapegoats
    - Supremacy of the military
    - Controlled mass media
    - Obsession with national security
    - Religion and government are intertwined
    - Corporate power is protected
    - Labor power is suppressed
    - Disdain for intellectuals and the arts
    - Obsession with crime and punishment
    - Rampant cronyism and corruption
    - Fraudulent elections
    - Rampant sexism

    You know that when even veterans groups are calling for ABC - it's time to get rid of this government. In 2015, support the candidate in your riding that has the best chance of defeating the Conservative.

    http://globalnews.ca/news/1667935/veterans-plea-for-military-to-join-protest-of-harper-government/

    Which, as you can imagine, garnered quite a response.

    KevinHamilton

    @caring canuck

    LOL,what a joke. Just because you post a list it doesn't mean any of it is happening at any extreme levels in Canada. Powerful Nationalism? So what? Disdain for Human Rights? Prove it. There is nothing on your list that applies to Canada's government and you wonder why people refer to these types of posts as insensitive rhetoric to those who have actually suffered under fascism.

    Your very ability to post hate filled, ignorant and outright false information freely on a publicly funded message board should show you just how far fetched and foolish your notions are. Try posting something like your list and other comments in a real fascist state and see what happens to you. The fact that you fail to see how free you are to post idiotic babblings while calling the government, and in fact every CPC member, fascists should provide you with enough irony to choke a horse.

    And the big guns come out! And that would be my post!

    caring canuck

    @KevinHamilton

    Give us a break. Under your government Canadians like me are on an "enemies list." Your government has gone out of it's way to silence critics - muzzling scientists, attacking environmental groups and charities with punitive audits - even yanking the grants of artists and blackballing them. That is a direct attack on free speech - which is a fundamental "human right" in a democracy.

    http://scienceblogs.com/confessions/2013/05/20/the-canadian-war-on-science-a-long-unexaggerated-devastating-chronological-indictment/

    Yay for me! Someone makes an assertion, someone else disagrees and offers the fruits of my research labour as, wait for it, evidence to back up their point of view. Normally, when presented with evidence that you disagree with you wouldn't make some sort of ad hominem disparagement of the author of the evidence. You could refute the evidence or produce your own evidence that would lead or a different conclusion or even offer up an alternate explanation or analysis of the data at hand. You could also challenge the validity of the data itself, how it was collected, whether or not what was collected is relevant to the question at hand or even if the kinds of things that were collected should count as any kind of evidence for anything at all.

    Yes, that's the way to respond to an evidence-based assertion that we disagree with! Reason! Argument! More evidence! Music to this librarian's ears, surely, to have his hard work engaged with!

    Ah, but our man @KevinHamilton sadly doesn't go there. And boy, this is just beautiful if you ask me.

    KevinHamilton
    @caring canuck

    So because John Dupuis from York University says so I'm just supposed to believe it? You'll have to do better than that.

    Yep, that's it. "So because John Dupuis from York University says so I'm just supposed to believe it? You'll have to do better than that."

    Of course, I didn't "just say so." I saw something that was going on that interested me and I had a few ideas about what might be happening. So I did some research, gathered some evidence, presented my findings and drew some conclusions.

    Frankly, I'm not sure what's "doing better" than presenting some evidence. It's not about me or where I work or what I do for a living, it's about the evidence. (My York STS talk from last fall goes into this in a bit more detail.)

    And so, what about my little promise to myself.

    Easy. To keep doing the work I'm doing, to continue pissing off he @kevinhamilton's of the world with the evidence, to keep advocating to science and openness. And to use this little exchange in every single presentation I make from now on. Because evidence.

    Happy new year.

    2 responses so far

    Best Science Books 2014: io9

    Jan 06 2015 Published by under best science books 2014, science books

    As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I've done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

    And here we are in 2014!

    As in previous years, my definition of "science books" is pretty inclusive, including books on technology, engineering, nature, the environment, science policy, history & philosophy of science, geek culture and whatever else seems to be relevant in my opinion.

    Today's list is io9 The Best Science Books of 2014.

    • Me, Myself and Why: Searching for the Science of Self by Jennifer Ouellette
    • What If? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
    • Lives in Ruins: Archaeologists and the Seductive Lure of Human Rubble by Marilyn Johnson
    • Dr. Mütter's Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine by Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz
    • The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science by Armand Marie Leroi
    • Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon by Kim Zetter
    • Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande
    • The Knowledge: How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch by Lewis Dartnell
    • Dodging Extinction: Power, Food, Money and the Future of Life on Earth by Anthony Barnosky
    • The Coming Swarm: DDOS Actions, Hacktivism and Civil Disobedience on the Internet by Molly Sauter
    • Invisible History of the Human Race: How DNA and History Shape our Identities and Our Futures by Christine Kenneally
    • Oxygen: A Four Billion Year History by Donald Canfield
    • How Not to be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg
    • WTF, Evolution?! A Theory of Unintelligible Design by Mara Grunbaum
    • Cosmigraphics: Picturing Space Through Time by Michael Benson
    • The Oldest Living Things in the World by Rachel Sussman
    • You Are Here: Around the World in 92 Minutes by Chris Hadfield
    • The Art of Space: The History of Space Art, From the Earliest Visions to the Graphics of the Modern Era by Ron Miller

    And check out my previous 2014 lists here!

    Many of the lists I use are sourced via the Largehearted Boy master list.

    (Astute readers will notice that I kind of petered out on this project last year and never got around to the end of year summary. The last few years I ended up featuring dozens of lists, virtually every list I could find that had science books on it. While it was kind of cool to be so comprehensive, not to mention that it gave the summary posts a certain statistical weight, it was also way more work than I had really envisioned way back in 2008 or so when I started doing this. As a result, I'm only going to highlight particularly large or noteworthy lists this year and forgo any kind of end of year summary. Basically, all the fun but not so much of the drudgery.)

    One response so far