Archive for: December, 2012

Best Science Books 2012: Cocktail Party Physics

Dec 23 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Cocktail Party Physics Baker’s Dozen: Sampling the Best Science Books of 2012.

  • The Particle at the End of the Universe by Sean M. Carroll
  • A Man of Misonceptions: The Life of an Eccentric in an Age of Change by John Glassie
  • The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation, by Jon Gertner
  • The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver
  • The Joy of X: A Guided Tour of Math from One to Infinity by Steven Strogatz
  • Fooling Houdini: Magicians, Mentalists, Math Geeks and the Hidden Powers of the Mind by Alex Stone
  • To The Last Breath: A Memoir of Going to Extremes by Francis Slakey
  • Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb by Jonathan Fetter-Vorm
  • Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History by Florence Williams
  • The Magic of Reality: How We Know What’s Really True by Richard Dawkins
  • Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen
  • Turing’s Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe by George Dyson
  • God’s Hotel: A Doctor, A Hospital, and a Pilgrimage to the Heart of Medicine by Victoria Sweet
  • Before the Lights Go Out: Conquering the Energy Crisis Before It Conquers Us by Maggie Koerth-Baker

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

One response so far

Best Science Books 2012: Technology and Learning / Joshua Kim

Dec 22 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Technology and Learning The 11 Best Nonfiction Books of 2012.

  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
  • The Signal and the Noise: Why Most Predictions Fail but Some Don't by Nate Silver
  • Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet by Andrew Blum
  • Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think by Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler
  • Hidden America: From Coal Miners to Cowboys, an Extraordinary Exploration of the Unseen People Who Make This Country Work by Jeanne Marie Laskas

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2012: Teaching Biology

Dec 21 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Top Books of 2012: Environmentalism and Climate Change, Evolution.

  • Evolution's Wedge: Competition and the Origins of Diversity by David W. Pfennig, Karin S. Pfennig
  • The Evolution of Parental Care by Nick J. Royle, Per T. Smiseth, Mathias Kolliker
  • Adaptive Speciation edited by Ulf Dieckmann, Michael Doebeli, Johan A. J. Metz, Diethard Tautz
  • Do Species Exist?: Principles of Taxonomic Classification by Werner Kunz
  • The Three Failures of Creationism: Logic, Rhetoric, and Science by Walter M. Fitch
  • Darwin's Devices: What Evolving Robots Can Teach Us About the History of Life and the Future of Technology by John Long
  • Systematics: A Course of Lectures by Ward C. Wheeler
  • Epigenetics: How Environment Shapes Our Genes by Richard C. Francis
  • Life's Ratchet: How Molecular Machines Extract Order from Chaos by Peter M. Hoffmann
  • The Evolutionary Strategies that Shape Ecosystems by J. Philip Grime, Simon Pierce
  • The Rise of Nuclear Fear by Spencer R. Weart
  • Science Left Behind: Feel-Good Fallacies and the Rise of the Anti-Scientific Left by Alex Berezow and Hank Campbell
  • The City and the Coming Climate: Climate Change in the Places We Live by Brian Stone Jr.
  • Finding Higher Ground: Adaptation in the Age of Warming by Amy Seidl
  • The Global Warming Reader: A Century of Writing About Climate Change by Bill McKibben
  • Our Dying Planet: An Ecologist's View of the Crisis We Face by Peter F. Sale
  • Renewable Energy: Power for a Sustainable Future by Godfrey Boyle
  • Climate Change: Biological and Human Aspects by Jonathan Cowie
  • Antarctic Ecosystems: An Extreme Environment in a Changing World by Alex D. Rogers, Nadine M. Johnston, Eugene J. Murphy and Andrew Clarke
  • Life in Europe Under Climate Change by Joseph Alcamo and Jorgen E. Olesen

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2012: The New Scientist

Dec 21 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: .

  • Connectome: How the brain's wiring makes us who we are by, Sebastian Seung
  • Gravity's Engines: How Bubble-Blowing Black Holes Rule Galaxies, Stars, and Life in the Cosmos by Caleb Scharf
  • Hallucinations by Oliver Sacks
  • Immortality: The Quest to Live Forever and How It Drives Civilization by Stephen Cave
  • Like a Virgin: How Science Is Redesigning the Rules of Sex by Aarathi Prasad
  • Pieces of Light: The new science of memory by Charles Fernyhough
  • Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves by George M. Church
  • The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone---Especially Ourselves by Dan Ariely
  • The Hour Between Dog and Wolf: Risk Taking, Gut Feelings and the Biology of Boom and Bust by John Coates
  • The Particle at the End of the Universe: How the Hunt for the Higgs Boson Leads Us to the Edge of a New World by Sean Carroll

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

One response so far

Around the Web: Amazon Needs Some Catalogers, Is the scientific literature self-correcting? and more

Dec 20 2012 Published by under around the web

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2012: Kobo

Dec 20 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Kobo Best of 2012.

  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
  • Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness by Susannah Cahalan
  • The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg
  • The Universe Within: From Quantum to Cosmos by Neil Turok
  • The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail-but Some Don't by Nate Silver
  • A Geography of Blood: Unearthing Memory from a Prairie Landscape by Candace Savage
  • The End of Growth by Jeff Rubin
  • Wait: The Art and Science of Delay by Frank Partnoy
  • The Launch Pad: Inside Y Combinator, Silicon Valley's Most Exclusive Schoolfor Startups by Randall Stross

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2012: The Independent

Dec 19 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Books of the Year 2012: Natural history, .

  • Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird by Tim Birkhead
  • Fighting for Birds: 25 Years in Nature Conservation by Mark Avery
  • My Garden & Other Animals by Mike Dilger
  • Field Guide to the Micro-Moths of Great Britain and Ireland by Phil Sterling, Mark Parsons, Richard Lewington
  • Animal Encounters: Human and Animal Interaction in Britain from the Norman Conquest to World War One by Arthur MacGregor
  • Tubes: behind the scenes at the internet by Andrew Blum
  • A History of the World in Twelve Maps by Jerry Brotton

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

Around the Web: Writing for free, The Web we lost, Librarian entrepreneurs and more

Dec 19 2012 Published by under around the web

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2012: The Scholarly Kitchen, Wit and Wisdom of an Engineer, Dwight Garner and Michiko Kakutani

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

The Scholarly Kitchen: Chefs’ Selections: The Best Books Read During 2012

  • The Signal and the Noise: Why Most Predictions Fail but Some Don'tby Nate Silver
  • Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Using data to Change the Worldby Beth Kanter and Katie Paine
  • The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation by Jon Gertner

 

Wit and Wisdom of an Engineer

  • The Revenge of Geography: What the Map Tells Us About Coming Conflictsby Robert D. Kaplan
  • The Signal and Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail-but Some Don'tNate Silver
  • Energy for Future Presidents: The Science Behind the Headlinesby Richard A. Muller
  • The End of Abundance: Economic Solutions to Water Scarcity by David Zetland

 

Dwight Garner

  • Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen

 

Michiko Kakutani

  • The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovationby Jon Gertner
  • Hallucinations by Oliver Sacks

 

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

Welcome to Yet Another Science Blogging Community: Phenomena!

Dec 18 2012 Published by under blogging, scholarly publishing, social media

Yes, the science blogging community has certainly seen some gyrations in the last few years with a bunch of new networks sprouting up, sometimes from the ashes of other networks, sometimes completely on their own.

The latest is Phenomena: A science salon hosted by National Geographic magazine.

Phenomena is a gathering of spirited science writers who take delight in the new, the strange, the beautiful and awe-inspiring details of our world. Phenomena is hosted by Jamie Shreeve, Executive Editor for Science at National Geographic magazine, who invites you to join the conversation.

So far at least, it's quite small with only four bloggers.

But what bloggers they are!

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