Archive for: December, 2012

A year in Open Access advocacy: 2012

While it has not generally been my practice to do year end review posts, artificially trying to tie the various and disparate strands of my blogging habits together into some sort of coherent story, I think for this year it's worth doing. And that's because my blogging year did seem to have a coherent theme -- advocating for a fairer and more just scholarly publishing ecosystem.

In particular I spent an awful lot of time advocating for Open Access in one way, shape or form. Not that I haven't always done so, but with all the various events happening in the academic and library worlds this year, it seemed to be a fairly consistent thread. Of course, not all the advocacy was directly for OA, some was for general reform of the scholarly communications system as a whole, redressing the imbalance between the power of publishers and libraries. Sometimes it was advocating for general fairness in the way the online world is regulated and governed.

At the end of the day -- hindsight tells me that my mission for 2012 was to talk about changing the world.

Let's see how that played out, month by month, post by post.

January

 

February

 

March

 

April

 

May

 

June

 

August

 

September

 

October

 

November

 

December

 

One of the big stories of the year was certainly the proposed Research Works Act legislation in the US, a story which took on a huge life of it's own, morphing and expanding into the related Elsevier boycott story. When I started collecting posts for those I really did not know what I was getting myself into as the searching and updating really took up the lion's share of my blogging time in the early part of the year. Believe it or not, I have probably more than 100 posts up to June 2012 or so waiting to be added. And still related to that is the whole Open Access petition campaign which I also participated in and blogged about later on in the year.

During the summer, the PeerJ announcement was something I blogged about. And the big story from the last half of the year was the SUNY Potsdam cancelling of their ACS subscriptions because they were too expensive. That  issue consumed the library blogosphere for quite a while in the fall and if the blogging traffic seems to have decreased I still don't think we've heard the last of the crisis in journal subscription costs, especially as it relates to the ACS. And who knows, maybe more publishers will be drawn into that.

And as the year ends, I'm drawn back into my futurological speculations, thinking about how science publishing should evolve and related to that, still thinking and still writing about how libraries could evolve. But that's for January, I hope.

One response so far

Around the Web: Open Access in the Humanities & Social Sciences, Top ed-tech trends of 2012, eBooks in libraries

Dec 31 2012 Published by under around the web, ebooks, education, open access

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2012: The Natural Capital

Dec 30 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: The Natural Capital Best Nature Books of 2012.

  • The Forest Unseen: A Year's Watch in Nature by David George Haskell
  • For the Birds: The Life of Roger Tory Peterson by Peggy Thomas and illustrated by Laura Jacques
  • Spring Wildflowers of the Northeast: A Natural History by Carol Gracie
  • AMC Guide to Outdoor Digital Photography: Creating Great Nature and Adventure Photos by Jerry Monkman
  • Outside Your Window: A First Book of Nature by Nicola Davies
  • The Nature Principle: Reconnecting with Life in a Virtual Age by Richard Louv

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2012: Heather Mallick, iFanboy, Joe Klein and more

Dec 29 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

Heather Mallick

  • The Energy of Slaves: Oil and the New Servitudeby Andrew Nikiforuk
  • Straphanger: Saving Our Cities and Ourselves from the Automobile by Taras Grescoe

 

iFanboy

  • Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb by Jonathan Fetter-Vorm

 

Joe Klein

  • The Revenge of Geography by Robert Kaplan

 

The San Francisco Examiner

  • Hallucinations by Oliver Sacks

 

FSG’s Favorite Books of 2012

  • Why Does the World Exist? An existential detective story by Jim Holt

 

Irish Times

  • The Golden Age of Botanical Artby Martyn Rix
  • The Scientists: An Epic of Discovery edited by Andrew Robinson

 

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2012: Brain Pickings

Dec 29 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Brain Pickings The Best Music Books of 2012, Psychology & Philosophy, Design, History.

  • Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learningby Gary Marcus
  • This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinkingby John Brockman
  • Why Does the World Exist?: An Existential Detective Storyby Jim Holt
  • The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Businessby Charles Duhigg
  • The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone — Especially Ourselvesby Dan Ariely
  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talkingby Susan Cain
  • Information Graphicsby Sandra Rendgen
  • The Origins of Sex: A History of the First Sexual Revolutionby Faramerz Dabhoiwala
  • Trees of Life: A Visual History of Evolutionby Theodore W. Pietsch
  • The Medical Book: From Witch Doctors to Robot Surgeons, 250 Milestones in the History of Medicineby Clifford A. Pickover
  • Leonardo da Vinci: Anatomistby Martin Clayton
  • The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind, and Brain, from Vienna 1900 to the Presentby Eric Kandel
  • A Glorious Enterprise: The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia and the Making of American Science by Robert McCracken Peck, Patricia Tyson Stroud, Rosamond Purcell

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

2 responses so far

Best Science Books 2012: San Francisco Chronicle

Dec 28 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: San Francisco Chronicle Best books of 2012: 100 recommended books.

  • Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History by Florence Williams
  • God's Hotel: A Doctor, a Hospital, and a Pilgrimage to the Heart of Medicine by Victoria Sweet
  • The Great Animal Orchestra: Finding the Origins of Music in the World's Wild Places by Bernie Krause
  • On a Farther Shore: The Life and Legacy of Rachel Carson by William Souder
  • Rabid: A Cultural History of the World's Most Diabolical Virus by Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy
  • Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

One response so far

Best Science Books 2012: Skeptically Speaking

Dec 27 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Skeptically Speaking #193 Science Books for Your Gift List.

  • Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes by Maria Konnikova
  • Gravity’s Engines: How Bubble-Blowing Black Holes Rule Galaxies, Stars, and Life in the Cosmos by Caleb A. Scharf
  • Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb by Jonathan Fetter-Vorm
  • Science Left Behind: Feel-Good Fallacies and the Rise of the Anti-Scientific Left by Alex Berezow and Hank Campbell
  • Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen
  • All Yesterdays Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric Animals by Darren Naish
  • Before the Lights Go Out: Conquering the Energy Crisis Before It Conquers Us by Maggie Koerth-Baker
  • Angel Killer: A True Story of Cannibalism Crime Fighting and Insanity in New York City by Blum, Deborah
  • Am I My Genes?: Confronting Fate and Family Secrets in the Age of Genetic Testing by Robert L. Klitzman
  • The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation by Jon Gertner
  • Incredible Arthropods: Insects, Spiders & More! by Kristie Reddick

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

Best Science (Fiction) Books 2012: io9

(Yeah, yeah, I know. This list isn't strictly part of my regular list of science books lists, but hey, it's Boxing Day and we should all be a little extra self-indulgent and buy ourselves something nice. Being a fan of the full range of science fiction, fantasy and horror genres, I have been paying attention to those "best of 2012" lists as I see them online -- as well as crime fiction and cookbooks, natch -- so I thought I'd share one of the nicest ones I've seen with all my readers. Enjoy!)

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: io9: The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy Books of 2012.

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

7 responses so far

Best Science Books 2012: Teaching Biology

Dec 25 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Teaching Biology: Top Books of 2012: Historical Geology.

  • The Goldilocks Planet: The 4 Billion Year Story of Earth's Climate by Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams
  • What is Life?: How Chemistry becomes Biology by Addy Pross
  • Secret Chambers: The Inside Story of Cells & Complex Life by Martin Brasier
  • Evolution of Fossil Ecosystems, Second Edition by Paul Selden and John Nudds
  • Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, Anticipating the Future by J. D. Macdougall
  • Jewels of the Early Earth: Minerals and Fossils of the Precambrian by Bruce L. Stinchcomb
  • Here on Earth: A Twin Biography of the Planet and the Human Race by Tim Flannery
  • Historical Geology by Reed Wicander and James S. Monroe
  • First Life: Discovering the Connections between Stars, Cells, and How Life Began by David Deamer

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2012: Discovery News

Dec 24 2012 Published by under best science books 2012, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I’ve been linking to and posting about all the “year’s best sciencey books” lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2012 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Discovery News A Little Cosmic Reading: Favorite Space Books.

  • The Particle at the End of the Universe by Sean M. Carroll
  • Gravity's Engines: How Bubble-Blowing Black Holes Rule Galaxies, Stars, and Life in the Cosmos by Caleb Scharf
  • Edge of the Universe: A Voyage to the Cosmic Horizon and Beyond by Paul Halpern
  • Why Does the World Exist? An Existential Detective Story by Jim Holt
  • Mirror Earth: The Search for Our Planet's Twin by Michael Lemonick
  • A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing by Lawrence Krauss
  • The Story of Earth:The First 4.5 Billion Years, from Stardust to Living Planet by Robert M. Hazen.

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up most of my lists from Largehearted Boy.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn’t a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs or The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks or maybe even something else from today's list.

No responses yet

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