Archive for: March, 2012

Best Science Books 2011: San Francisco Chronicle 100 Recommended Books, LA Public Library, The A.V. Club

Mar 15 2012 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

A couple more lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.


San Francisco Chronicle 100 recommended books

  • American Anthrax: Fear, Crime, and the Investigation of the Nation's Deadliest Bioterror Attack by Jeanne Guillemin
  • Railroaded: The Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern America by Richard White
  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Los Angeles Public Library: Best of 2011: Fiction and Non-Fiction for Adults

  • Our bodies, ourselves by the Boston Women's Health Book Collective.

The Onion A.V. Club: The best books we read in 2011

  • Triumph Of The City by Edward Glaeser

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

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Best Science Books 2011: Powell's Books

Mar 14 2012 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Powell's Books Staff Top 5s of 2011.

  • The Psychopath Test: A Journey through the Madness Industry by Jon Ronson
  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer
  • Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku
  • The Murder Room: The Heirs of Sherlock Holmes Gather to Solve the World's Most Perplexing Cold Cases by Michael Capuzzo
  • Feynman by Jim Ottaviani and Leland Myrick
  • A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor
  • Aerotropolis: The Way We'll Live Next by John D. Kasarda and Greg Lindsay
  • Genes, Giants, Monsters, and Men: The Surviving Elites of the Cosmic War and Their Hidden Agenda by Joseph P Farrell

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: Wall Street Journal

Mar 13 2012 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Year in Reviews: Wall Street Journal: Twelve Months of Reading.

  • The Quantum Universe: (And Why Anything That Can Happen, Does) by Brian Cox, Jeff Forshaw
  • The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Stephen Pinker
  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  • The Science of Evil: On Empathy and the Origins of Cruelty by Simon Baron-Cohen
  • The Art of Science: A Natural History of Ideas by Richard Hamblyn
  • The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom by Evgeny Morozov

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Around the Web: Read E-Books On Multiple Devices, Libraries getting out of the ebook business and more

Mar 13 2012 Published by under around the web

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Friday Fun: Students Still No Closer to Knowing What the Heck a Provost Is

Mar 09 2012 Published by under friday fun

I'm kinda hoping my provost isn't reading this (Hi, Patrick!)...

Students Still No Closer to Knowing What the Heck a Provost Is

While a leading Washington think tank maintains that its recent survey of college provosts offered fresh insights into the role of these decision makers in academia today, some students across the country remain puzzled at its implications and, even, just what a provost does anyway.

*snip*

Jody Day of Wilson Community College whipped out her cell phone and hit a few keys. "Aha. I know that the origin of the word means 'keeper of a prison.' Therefore, I'm sure the provost is the person who orders uniforms for cleaning staff, security and maybe even the sports team. Maybe the provost makes the parking rules, too."

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Around the Web: The future of the book business, Random price spikes and more

Mar 09 2012 Published by under around the web

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Around the Web: Engineers crashing the gates of the library, Youth & digital media, Pricing bots and more

Mar 06 2012 Published by under Uncategorized

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Friday Fun: Lines from The Princess Bride that Double as Comments on Freshman Composition Papers

Mar 02 2012 Published by under education, friday fun, kids today

Personally, I find it inconceivable that any writer could come up with such a wonderful list.

Lines from The Princess Bride that Double as Comments on Freshman Composition Papers.

Here's a few to refresh your memory:

"You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

"At a time like this that's all you can think to say?"

"Nonsense. You're only saying that because no one ever has."

The Princess Bride (memorable quotes) is one of my favourite films and I'm sure it's one of yours. There are no doubt lines from other films that could be re-purposed as essay comments or even lines that could be slightly altered and would make terrific sense as essay comments.

I can think of one from TPB: "Hello. My name is Professor Montoya. You massacred my essay. Prepare to fail."

Or perhaps from another film that's been a source of a lot of sayings, "Of all the classes, in all the universities, in all the world, you walk into mine."

There's got to be more...let's see what we can come up with in the comments!

7 responses so far

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