Archive for: January, 2012

Friday Fun: 5 things you should know before dating a scientist

Jan 13 2012 Published by under culture of science, friday fun

All I have to say is that I'm really glad this wasn't published 20-something years ago.

5 things you should know before dating a scientist

1. We can figure things out. Understand, we're paid to dig deep, find the secrets and wade through bullshit. We can pick up on subtleties, so what you think you are hiding from us won't be hidden for long. Sure, we'll act surprised when you eventually tell us you failed freshman biology in college -- but we already knew.

We don't take shit from anyone, so don't lie to us or give a load of bullshit. We spend all day separating fact from fiction, listening to scientific supply sales reps and dealing with students' bullshit. If you make us do the same with you, you're just gonna piss us off. And don't think we'll be quiet about it. We'll respond with the vengeance of an science blogger railing against some researcher's recently-retracted paper -- and we'll enjoy doing it.

Just tell us the truth. We can handle it.

Perhaps you'll want to hide this post from your significant other or even more-importantly, non-sciencey potential significant others.

Any other warnings we should all share?

One response so far

Science Online 2012: Library and librarian sessions

With the final countdown underway and the conference less than a week away, this post follows my post on library people in attendance at Science Online 2012 from a few weeks ago.

And I'd like to start off with another best-tweet-ever, this time Marieclaire Shanahan retweeting Colin Schutze:

+ they'll be fascinating! RT @_ColinS_: #Scio12 Newbie Tips: You will meet more librarians in one day than you thought existed in the world.

And that's long been one of my goals, to promote the integration of librarians into faculty and researcher conferences and social networks. And Science Online has always been a great example of how librarians and other library people could successfully integrate themselves into our patron community. My reflections on the success of last year's libraryish sessions lead me to propose some ideas for this year and ultimately to issue a kind of manifesto.

Related to that, I have an idle thought. Or question, rather.

Is there any other non-librarian conference out there with as much librarian presence and involvement as Science Online? I suspect it might be something in the Digital Humanities, but would love to hear about people's experiences.

Anyways, here's a list of all the librar* sessions at Science Online 2010:

Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm
D1S4c: Room 4. Undergraduate Education: Collaborating to Create the Next Generation of Open Scientists (discussion) - John Dupuis and Tanya Noel

Science faculty and librarians can collaborate on many aspects of undergraduate education - two ideas are the focus of this discussion. First: How can we best help undergrads understand and explore the scholarly information landscape? In addition to formal sources like journal articles, informal sources (e.g., blogs) are of increasing importance/relevance, which raises a question: How do we get students to think about what formal and informal really mean? How do we - faculty, librarians and others - work together to teach students to navigate the disciplinary landscape and become productive and critical consumers of - and contributors to - the disciplinary conversation? Second: How do we introduce students to the great big wide world of open science? How do the various players in higher education communicate to the next generation the incredible depth and complexity of what going on out there? How do we raise (inspire? support?) the next generation of Cameron Neylons, Steve Koches and Jean-Claude Bradleys (not to mention the next generation of Dorothea Salos and Christina Pikases)?

Friday, 10:45-11:45am
D2S2b: Room 3. Teaching Core Competencies in Science: Solving Algebraic and Word Problems (discussion) - Kiyomi Deards and Khadijah M. Britton

Math skills are necessary to the successful pursuit of science. Unfortunately, many students have not been given the tools to understand crucial core math concepts, or how they fit into the scientific process, by the time they enter a biology, physics, chemistry, or other science class. Co-moderated by a numeric dyslexic and a librarian, this session will be an adventure in communicating what we really mean by words like "logarithms," "meta-analysis," "distribution" or even "zero." We'll work through some word problems and analyze some graphs as a group, and try our hand at finding the shortest distance between a concept and a eureka. Bring your expertise, questions and creativity, and come out with new ways to communicate math simply, clearly and effectively.

Friday, 10:45-11:45am
D2S2d: Room 5. The Semantic Web (discussion) - Kristi Holmes and Antony Williams

Semantic Web-based projects are becoming increasingly more popular across a wide variety of disciplines. The session will provide a basic introduction to the topic and highlight different perspectives from people working in this space. We'll show *why* this technology is being used in so many areas - and demonstrate the benefits of linked data (especially in areas related to data reuse for visualizations, research discovery, and more). Open PHACTS, VIVO, and a number of the open government initiatives are good examples and there are many others. This session can serve as an introduction to the concept and highlight interesting and different ways that this technology is being used successfully.

Saturday, 9:30-10:30am
D3S1d: Room 5. Digital Preservation and Science Online (discussion) - Trevor Owens and Bonnie Swoger

Preserving Science Online? What should we be keeping for posterity? Science is now a largely digital affair. A lot of resources are being invested in ensuring that scientific datasets and digital incarnations of traditional scholarly journals will be around for the future. However, little effort has been spent on the preservation of new modes of science communication; like blogging and podcasting, or on things like citizen science projects. After a brief introduction to digital preservation, this session will serve to brainstorm and identify critical at-risk digital content and articulate why that content is important. Time permitting, we will kick around ideas for how we might go about putting partnerships together to collect and preserve this content. Come prepared to discuss what science is happening online that you think is important and why? How should we go about selecting what to preserve? Lastly, who should go about ensuring long term access to this content?

Saturday, 1:00-2:00pm
D3S3e: Room 6. Genomic Medicine: From Bench to Bedside (discussion) - Kristi Holmes and Sandra Porter

This session will serve as an introduction to the topic of personalized medicine from the perspective of major stakeholders including: scientists, physicians, patients and their advocates, community groups and media professionals. We'll begin with an introduction to the basic concepts and efforts in this area, followed by a discussion of information resources to serve stakeholder groups including relevant clinical, consumer health, and advocacy and policy resources. Various initiatives by government agencies, the commercial sector and academia will be discussed, including: Genetics Home Reference, 23andMe, PatientsLikeMe, and more

The Friday Blitz Talks & Demos also have some mini-sessions by library people or which are of interest from library perspective.

2:15-2:30pm - Writing for Robots: Getting your research noticed in the algorithmic era - William Gunn, Mendeley
With the volume of research output always rising, it's very hard to stay on top of what you need to read. Practically no one finds research articles anymore by going to the journal first and reading the table of contents. We all depend to some degree on algorithms to help us find what we should know. I'd like to talk a little about how some of the major algorithms work, how knowledge of the algorithms can make you a better writer, and how search and recommendation work together to bring you just the right paper at the right time. I'll present some specific examples of situations where these principles can be applied in three phases of research - starting a project, actively doing research, and writing up your results.

3:00-3:15pm - Research Discovery: Finding Networking Nirvana on the Semantic Web - Kristi Holmes
VIVO is an open source, open ontology research discovery platform for hosting information about scientists and their interests, activities, and accomplishments. The rich data in VIVO can be repurposed and shared to highlight expertise and facilitate discovery at many levels. Across implementations, VIVO provides a uniform semantic structure to enable a new class of tools which can use the rich data to advance science. There are currently over 50 VIVO implementations in the United States and over 20 international VIVO projects. This presentation will provide a brief description of VIVO and will demonstrate how diverse groups are not only using VIVO, but are also developing apps to consume the semantically-rich data for visualizations, enhanced multi-site search, discovery, and more. Learn more at http://vivoweb.org.

3:45-4:00pm - PaperCritic - Jason Priem (on behalf of Martin Bachwerk)
In a world where our lives are broadcast by Facebook and Twitter, our news consumption is dominated by blogs and our knowledge is defined by Wikipedia articles, science somehow remains 20 years behind in terms of communicating about its advances. PaperCritic aims to improve the situation by offering researchers a way of monitoring all types of feedback about their scientific work, as well as allowing everyone to easily review the work of others, in a fully open and transparent environment. The demo will give an overview of the site's main functions as well as discuss some plans for the future. Feel welcome to visit http://www.papercritic.com in the meantime to check it out for yourself.

No responses yet

Around the Web: Some posts on The Research Works Act (Now chronological!)

Note: this post is superseded by: Around the Web: Research Works Act, Elsevier boycott & FRPAA.

Following on my post from yesterday on Scholarly Societies: It's time to abandon the AAP over The Research Works Act, I thought I'd gather together some of the recent posts on the issue.

The Wikipedia article is here, full text of the bill here and status here.

It's worth watching pretty well everthing Peter Suber is writing on this issue on Google+.

Of course, if I've missed any, please let me know in the comments.

For those that are interesting, I'm using this Google Doc as a scratch file to hold links in between updates.

Update 2012.01.08: Added a bunch more today. I'll probably get around to putting all this in chronological order in the next few days.
Update 2012.01.09: Added many more, including some stragglers. Also, now in chronological order.
Update 2012.01.11: Another big update.
Update 2012.01.17. Yet another big update before leaving for Science Online. It includes a few stragglers. I probably won't get around to another update until after I return.

15 responses so far

Friday Fun: Top Ten Signs You're An Adult

Jan 07 2012 Published by under friday fun

Ok, Friday Fun a day late. But better late than never, right?

Anyways, Top Ten Signs You're An Adult. And apparently punctuality and predictability aren't ones I've mastered.

  • All of a sudden everyone is taking about their "401k".
  • You have friends who have houses or really nice apartments.
  • You find your grandparents adorable and your parents hilarious.
  • You're freaking tired.
  • Your health is suddenly a big deal.
  • Christmas is just kind of like, whatever.
  • You don't care if you are totally uncool. You have no problem telling people that Ke$ha's 'Tik Tok' is one of the best pop songs ever written. You proudly wear your 2001 Britney tour tee. You watch movies that are for a demographic 10 years younger than yours. You don't give a monkey what people think about your tastes. You have no idea what the hot new bands are and you just don't care. You don't have the energy to follow trends or to pretend to be cool. And this. Is. Awesome.
  • Younger people have no idea who the Spice Girls are.
  • You root for the adults in kids movies.
  • ...and I guess you'll have to find out for yourself.

One response so far

Best Science Books 2011: Russell Blackford, Stumbling Virtue, Men's Journal, Houston Chronicle

Jan 06 2012 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

Russell Blackford

  • The Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven Pinker

Stumbling Virtue

  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer
  • Moby Duck: The True Story of 28,800 Bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, Including the Author, Who Went in Search of Them by Donovan Hohn
  • The Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard

Men's Journal

  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer

Houston Chronicle

  • Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain by David Eagleman

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

One response so far

Best Science Books 2011: Mother Nature Network

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Mother Nature Network: Best green and environmental books of 2011.

  • The Best Science and Nature Writing of 2011 edited by Mary Roach
  • Once and Future Giants: What Ice Age Extinctions Tell Us About the Fate of Earth's Largest Mammals by Sharon Levy
  • The Beekeeper's Lament: How One Man and a Half a Billion Honeybees Help Feed America by Hannah Nordhaus
  • Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology by Alexis Madrigal
  • Listed: Dispatches from America's Endangered Species Act by Joe Roman
  • Homegrown and Handmade: A Practical Guide to More Self-Reliant Living by Deborah Niemann

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Scholarly Societies: It's time to abandon the AAP over The Research Works Act

So, The Research Works Act, H.R. 3699 is a new piece of legislation that is being introduced in the US.

Not surprisingly it's supported by the American Association of Publishers and its Professional and Scholarly Publishing (AAP/PSP).

The legislation is aimed at preventing regulatory interference with private-sector research publishers in the production, peer review and publication of scientific, medical, technical, humanities, legal and scholarly journal articles. This sector represents tens of thousands of articles which report on, analyze and interpret original research; more than 30,000 U.S. workers; and millions of dollars invested by publishers in staff, editorial, technological, capital and operational funding of independent peer review by specialized experts. North American-based science journal publishers alone account for 45% of all peer-reviewed papers published annually for researchers worldwide.

"The professional and scholarly publishing community thanks Representatives Issa and Maloney for supporting their significant investments that fund innovations and enable the essential peer-review process maintaining the high standards of U.S. scientific research," said Tom Allen, President and CEO, Association of American Publishers.

"America's PSP publishers are making more research information available to more people, through more channels, than ever before in our history. At a time when job retention, U.S. exports, scholarly excellence, scientific integrity and digital copyright protection are all priorities, the Research Works Act ensures the sustainability of this industry."

The Research Works Act will prohibit federal agencies from unauthorized free public dissemination of journal articles that report on research which, to some degree, has been federally-funded but is produced and published by private sector publishers receiving no such funding. It would also prevent non-government authors from being required to agree to such free distribution of these works. Additionally, it would preempt federal agencies' planned funding, development and back-office administration of their own electronic repositories for such works, which would duplicate existing copyright-protected systems and unfairly compete with established university, society and commercial publishers.

This is a rather bald-faced attack on the open access movement, attempting to restrict all kinds of sharing mechanisms and open access publishing ventures. Institutional and disciplinary repositories and open access mandates seem particularly to be the targets. Essentially, it wants to give a free hand to the scholarly publishing establishment.

This is what Peter Suber has to say in a related Google+ thread:

By prohibiting federal agencies from requiring grantees to assent to OA, this bill takes an approach similar to the Fair Copyright in Research Works Act (FCRWA), introduced twice by John Conyers. The chief difference I see so far is that FCRWA would have amended US copyright law and RWA would not. But the public-interest objections to both bills are the same.

*snip*

The AAP/PSP press release in support of the bill <http://goo.gl/aaVnw> says that the bill's purpose is "To End Government Mandates on Private-Sector Scholarly Publishing" and "prevent[] regulatory interference with private-sector research publishers...." This is the same rhetoric publishers have used for years. As usual, they neglect to say that the NIH policy regulates grantees, not publishers. They neglect to say that NIH-funded authors in effect ask publishers two questions, not one: "Will you publish my article?" and "Will you publish it under these terms?" It's a business proposition that publishers are free to take or leave. Finally, the AAP and PSP neglect to say that 100% of surveyed publishers accommodate the NIH policy, or are willing to take that business proposition <http://goo.gl/4kKjc>. In fact, we could make a serious case that this counts as publisher consent under Section 2.1 of the bill.

And more. There's quite a bit of coverage of this issue on various sites. You can get more information and commentary from Tim O'Reilly, Rebecca Rosen and Cable Green. They can explain the nuts and bolts better than I can.

This is a long preamble to what my main point is.

The AAP/PSP membership includes many scholarly societies: American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Geophysical Union, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Institute of Physics, Association for Computing Machinery, Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers, Inc., Optical Society of America and many others. These societies will certainly have among their vision and mission statements something about advancing the common good, promoting the scholarly work of their membership and scholarship in their fields as a whole.

To my mind, The Research Works Act is directly opposed to those goals.

The AAP/PSP has long reflected a stark divide between the large commercial publishers and the supposedly more noble and altruistic scholarly societies. The divide has now become too wide, the cognitive dissonance for those on the sidelines too jarring.

Scholarly societies -- it is now time for you to walk away. Leave the AAP and chart your own course.

6 responses so far

A year of books: 2011

Jan 05 2012 Published by under book review, personal, reading diary, science books

I'm including here a list of all the books I've read in 2011, as well as some commentary on my particular year in reading. I always enjoy when people post these sorts of lists online and actually rather enjoy doing so myself.

I've been doing this for a few years now: 2010, 2009, 2008 and 2007.

If you've posted such a list online somewhere, please post a link in the comments. I'd love to see it!

The list of books I'm posting below includes all the books I started in 2011, with the exception of books that I'm currently reading. In other words, it also includes a few books I've abandoned unfinished. As it happens, I've been recording every book I've read since 1983 in a little booklet and have been mostly transcribing those lists on my other (mostly lapsed) blog I've been occasionally transcribing the list on a year by year basis. I've stalled a bit the last couple of years, and I keep saying I'll resume but haven't yet.

Trends in my reading this year?

  • My book reading time has decreased a little this year for a number of reasons, from 70ish last year to 60ish this year. First of all, I haven't read as many really good page-turner novels as in past years, so this slowed me down as I tend to get bogged down when I'm not really gripped. As well, the iPad and iPhone are reading time-sinks. In a sense, I'm not reading less, just reading more that's online. That's neither good nor bad, automatically, it just is. I do see a tendency in myself to just mindlessly surf and graze and look for the next twitter endorphin hit on my iDevices when I could be focused on something more useful or engaging.
  • I mentioned abandoned books. It was a bad year for those, for sure, just like last year. I won't say how many, exactly, or which ones, but as I get older I'm not quite as willing to stick with a book until the bitter end. If I look back at some of the older lists I've done, in those days I would have finished 100% of the books I started.
  • My genre tastes continue to shift quite a bit as I get older as well. I find I'm reading more mystery and crime fiction as the years go by and this year is no exception. As you might be able to tell from the list below, I tend towards the hardboiled & noir.
  • My science fiction reading this year has decreased really dramatically. It's not that I love SFFH any less, but somehow in 2011 I didn't seem to get charged by many SF books. I think I'm still suffering a bit of SF burnout after judging the Sunburst Award a few years ago.
  • But whoa, did I read way more graphic novels this year than in any year I've been doing these lists! Fiction, non-fiction, science, superheroes, all across the spectrum of graphicy goodness. I've really enjoyed this a lot. And it helped prop up the numbers in a slowish reading year.
  • The Buffy obsession moderated this year a bit, but there's still a lot of graphic Buffy on the list from Season 8 and, not on the list yet, season 9 issue by issue.
  • I've continued updating my reading on Good Reads, which has been very fun this year. If you're on the service yourself, add me as a friend.
  • As far as magazines are concerned, the ones I read regularly has dropped off a bit in the past few years. Right now, it's Locus, The New York Review of Science Fiction, The Walrus and about 2/3 of the issues of Classic Rock.

Reading resolutions?

  • Spend a bit less time mindlessly iConnected and more time engaged with useful and engaging texts, be they e- or p-, book or ebook. This is especially true of my commuting time.
  • More novels, more science fiction, and it's time to get back to more short story collections for my commute. I also want to get back to reading more of the annual science writing collections.
  • It would be nice to get the total back up to 70ish again in 2012.
  • It would also be nice to review a few more of the books I read here, especially the fiction and graphic novels.

So, here goes.

  1. Richard Stark's Parker, Vol. 1: The Hunter by Darwyn Cooke and Richard Stark
  2. The Lineup: The World's Greatest Crime Writers Tell the Inside Story of Their Greatest Detectives by Otto Penzler
  3. New Avengers, Vol. 1: Breakout by Brian Michael Bendis, David Finch and Danny Miki
  4. It Was the War of the Trenches by Jacques Tardi
  5. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
  6. Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld
  7. Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay
  8. Ôoku: The Inner Chambers, Vol. 2 by Fumi Yoshinaga
  9. The Outfit by Richard Stark
  10. Year's Best SF 13 by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer
  11. Magnus, Robot Fighter 4000 A.D. V.1 by Russ Manning & Robert Schaefer & Eric Freiwald
  12. Hellboy: Unnatural Selection by Tim Lebbon
  13. DC: The New Frontier, Vol. 1 by Darwyn Cooke
  14. Evolution: The Story of Life on Earth by Jay Hosler, Kevin Cannon and Zander Cannon (review)
  15. Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Tales by Joss Whedon, Amber Benson, Becky Cloonan and Jane Espenson
  16. Galileo by J. L. Heilbron (review)
  17. On the Grid: A Plot of Land, An Average Neighborhood, and the Systems that Make Our World Work by Scott Huler (review)
  18. The Crime on Cote des Neiges by David Montrose
  19. Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution by Holly Tucker
  20. City Infernal by Edward Lee
  21. Axis by Robert Charles Wilson
  22. Open Access: What You Need to Know Now by Walt Crawford (review)
  23. How Professors Think: Inside the Curious World of Academic Judgment by Michele Lamont
  24. We Are The Engineers! by Angela Melick (review)
  25. The Silencers by Donald Hamilton
  26. The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA by Mark Schultz, Zander Cannon and Kevin Cannon (review)
  27. Hereville: How Mirka Got Her Sword by Barry Deutsch
  28. The Mammoth Book of Best Crime Comics by Paul Gravett
  29. The Sword-Edged Blonde by Alex Bledsoe
  30. Buffy the Vampire Slayer Omnibus, Volume 4 by Various
  31. Cory Doctorow's Futuristic Tales Of The Here And Now by Cory Doctorow, Dara Naraghi, J. C. Vaughn and James L. Kuhoric
  32. The Walking Dead Volume 14: No Way Out by Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard
  33. Boneshaker by Cherie Priest
  34. Onward Towards Our Noble Deaths by Shigeru Mizuki
  35. Brimstone by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child
  36. Last Car to Elysian Fields by James Lee Burke (review)
  37. M.A.R.S. Patrol Total War by Wallace Wood
  38. Reframing Academic Leadership by Lee G. Bolman and Joan V. Gallos (LIAL post)
  39. The Complete Essex County by Jeff Lemire (review)
  40. Ray Bradbury's Something Wicked This Way Comes: The Authorized Adaptation by Ray Bradbury and Ron Wimberly (review)
  41. Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles: The Authorized Adaptation by Ray Bradbury, Dennis Calero (review)
  42. The King of Plagues: A Joe Ledger Novel by Jonathan Maberry (review)
  43. The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2010 by Freeman Dyson and Tim Folger
  44. Monster Island by Christopher Golden and Thomas E Sniegoski (review)
  45. The Reckoning by Kelley Armstrong
  46. Paying for It by Chester Brown
  47. Monoculture: How One Story is Changing Everything by F.S. Michaels
  48. Meet Me at the Morgue by Ross Macdonald
  49. Gotham Central Book 1: In the Line of Duty by Greg Rucka, Ed Brubaker and Michael Lark
  50. Warchild by Karin Lowachee
  51. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot (Lacks Effect post)
  52. Feynman by Jim Ottaviani and Leland Myrick (review)
  53. I Am Ozzy by Ozzy Osbourne and Chris Ayres
  54. The Bottoms by Joe R. Lansdale
  55. A Book of Tongues by Gemma Files
  56. Iron Man: My Journey through Heaven and Hell with Black Sabbath by Tony Iommi
  57. The Walking Dead Volume 15: We Find Ourselves by Robert Kirkman, Charlie Adlard
  58. George R.R. Martin's Fevre Dream by George R.R. Martin, Daniel Abraham, William Christensen and Rafa Lopez
  59. Green River Killer: A True Detective Story by Jeff Jensen and Jonathan Case
  60. Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight Volume 8: Last Gleaming by Joss Whedon, Jane Espenson, Scott Allie and Georges Jeanty

Now some lists, in no particular order.

Notable Fiction

Notable Non-Fiction

Notable Graphic Novels

I hope this list provides a little inspiration to all my readers to compile their own reading list for the year. I look forward to seeing them -- feel free to drop a link in the comments.

One response so far

Best Science Books 2011: Bachelors Degree Online, Devourer of Books, The Progressive, Bookriot

Jan 04 2012 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

Bachelors Degree Online: The 20 Best Books of 2011 You Should Read Over Winter Break

  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer

Devourer of Books

  • Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution by Holly Tucker
  • Sex on Six Legs: Lessons on Life, Love, & Language From the Insect World by Marlene Zuk
  • A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor

The Progressive: 5 Favorite Books of 2011

  • Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie: A Tale of Love and Fallout by Laura Redniss

Bookriot: Best Books of 2011: The Superlatives

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: Booklist Online Editors' Choice

Jan 04 2012 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Booklist Online Editors' Choice.

  • The Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine, and the Murder of a President By Candice Millard
  • Becoming Dr. Q: My Journey from Migrant Farm Worker to Brain Surgeon By Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa and Mim Eichler Rivas
  • Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature, and the Shaping of the American Nation By Andrea Wulf
  • The Book of Universes: Exploring the Limits of the Cosmos By John D. Barrow
  • Moby-Duck: The True Story of 28,000 Bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, Including the Author, Who Went in Search of Them By Donovan Hohn
  • A Planet of Viruses By Carl Zimmer
  • The Quantum Story: A History in 40 Moments By Jim Baggott
  • The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water By Charles Fishman
  • The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood By James Gleick
  • The Most Human Human: What Talking to Computers Teaches Us about What It Means to Be Alive By Brian Christian
  • The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement By David Brooks
  • The Atlas of Birds: Diversity, Behavior, and Conservation By Mike Unwin
  • Atlas of the Great Plains By Stephen J. Lavin and others
  • Encyclopedia of American Environmental History. 4v. Ed. by Kathleen A. Brosnan
  • Encyclopedia of Pollution. 2v. By Alexander E. Gates and Robert P. Blauvelt
  • Patrick Moore's Data Book of Astronomy. 2d ed. Ed. by Patrick Moore and Robin Rees

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

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