Best Science Books 2011: Brain Pickings

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Brain Pickings The 11 Best Science Books of 2011.

  • The Beginning of Infinity: Explanations That Transform the World by David Deutsch
  • Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie: A Tale of Love and Fallout by Lauren Redniss
  • The Physics Book: From the Big Bang to Quantum Resurrection, 250 Milestones in the History of Physics by Clifford A. Pickover
  • The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True by Richard Dawkins
  • Field Notes on Science & Nature by Michael R. Canfield (Editor)
  • Feynman by Jim Ottaviani (Author), Leland Myrick (Illustrator)
  • Culture: Leading Scientists Explore Societies, Art, Power, and Technology by John Brockman (editor)
  • The Man of Numbers: Fibonacci's Arithmetic Revolution by Keith Devlin
  • Future Science: Essays from the Cutting Edge by Max Brockman (editor)

(Only 9 titles are listed as two from the Brain Pickings list were pre-2011.)

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: The Washington Post

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Washington Post Top 10, 50 Best Non-Fiction Books, Great photobooks of 2011.

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard
  • In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives by Steven Levy
  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer
  • Never Say Die: The Myth and Marketing of the New Old Age by Susan Jacoby
  • Stolen World: A Tale of Reptiles, Smugglers and Skullduggery by Jennie Erin Smith
  • Visions of Earth: Beauty, Majesty, Wonder by National Geographic
  • Ocean Soul by Brian Skerry

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: Greg Laden, NYT Gift Books, London Evening Standard

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

Greg Laden's Blog

  • Mummies, Cannibals and Vampires: the History of Corpse Medicine from the Renaissance to the Victorians by Richard Sugg
  • Fool Me Twice: Fighting the Assault on Science in America by Shawn Lawrence Otto
  • The Science of Kissing: What Our Lips Are Telling Us by Sheril Kirshenbaum
  • Kaufman Field Guide to Advanced Birding by Kenn Kaufman

New York Times Gift Books

  • The Practical Pyromaniac: Build Fire Tornadoes, One-Candlepower Engines, Great Balls of Fire, and More Incendiary Devices by William Gurstelle
  • A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor
  • Industrial Light & Magic: The Art of Innovation by Pamela Glintenkamp

London Evening Standard

  • Aping Mankind: Neuromania, Darwinitis and the Misrepresentation of Humanity by Raymond Tallis
  • The Genius In My Basement by Alexander Masters
  • Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about Our Everyday Deceptions by Stephen L. Macknik, Susana Martinez-Conde
  • The Cafo Reader: The Tragedy of Industrial Animal Factories by Daniel Imhoff

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: San Francisco Chronicle

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: San Francisco Chronicle Biographies, Essays, History, Nature, Architecture, Travel.

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard
  • South With the Sun: Roald Amundsen, His Polar Explorations, and the Quest for Discovery by Lynne Cox
  • Evolution by Jean-Baptiste de Panafieu,
  • Fire Season: Field Notes From a Wilderness Lookout by Philip Connors
  • My Green Manifesto: Down the Charles River in Pursuit of a New Environmentalism by David Gessner
  • Maphead: Charting the Wide, Weird World of Geography Wonks by Ken Jennings

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: Sustainable Cities Collective

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Sustainable Cities Collective Best Books 2011.

  • Landscapes in Landscapes by Piet Oudolf
  • The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment by Ann M. Wolfe
  • Field Notes from Science and Nature by Michael R. Canfield (Editor)
  • Genius of Life: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted by Justin Martin
  • Making Healthy Places: Designing and Building for Health, Well-being, and Sustainability by Andrew Dannenberg (Editor), Howard Frumkin (Editor), and Richard Jackson (Editor)
  • MAPS by Paula Scher
  • The New American Landscape: Leading Voices on the Future of Sustainable Gardening by Thomas Christopher (Editor)
  • Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier by Edward L. Glaeser
  • The View from Lazy Point: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World by Carl Safina
  • The Agile City: Building Well-being and Wealth in an Era in Climate Change by James Russell
  • Gateway: Visions for an Urban National Park by Alexander Brash (editor), Jaime Hand (editor), Kate Orff (editor)
  • Small, Gritty, and Green: The Promise of America's Smaller Industrial Cities in a Low-carbon World by Catherine Tumber
  • Urban Green: Architecture for the Future by Neil Chambers

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Friday Fun: 6 Pop Culture Visionaries Who Get Too Much Credit

Now this one should start some really good arguments in the comments!

6 Pop Culture Visionaries Who Get Too Much Credit

  • Gene Roddenberry (Star Trek)
  • George Lucas (Star Wars)
  • Stan Lee (X Men, and really the whole Marvel Comics shebang)

    Who Actually Deserves the Credit:

    While Stan Lee and Jack Kirby did create the core concept in 1963 -- teenage mutant superheroes living in a mansion helping Professor X fight Magneto -- their vision of the team was so unsuccessful that Marvel stopped creating new X-Men stories in 1969. They ran in reprints for a while, until the book was finally given to unknown writer Chris Claremont, who "transformed a single underachieving comic into the best-selling superhero franchise of its time." He did this with a host of new and reimagined characters, long, complex story lines, a fundamental shift in the book's focus on wish-fulfillment and so, so, so much mutant boning.

    And Claremont did that for 17 straight years (Lee, by contrast, wrote X-Men for less than four). Before Claremont left the franchise in 1991, he started a second monthly X-Men series, and #1 of that series holds the Guinness World Record as the top-selling comic book of all time.

    Excelsior!

  • Gary Gygax (Dungeons and Dragons)
  • JJ Abrams (Lost)
  • Matt Groening (The Simpsons)

To the extent that I know enough about the various franchises to comment, I have to say I pretty well agree with the above evaluations.

Want me to throw one out? Black Sabbath. Ozzy gets way too much credit for their success. It was as much if not more Toni Iommi, Geezer Butler and Bill Ward that made the Sabbath sound!

How about you? Who do you think gets too much credit?

Best Science Books 2011: New Statesman, National Book Award, New York Magazine

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

New Statesman

  • Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values by Sam Harris
  • Great Railway Maps of the World by Mark Ovenden
  • Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

National Book Award

  • Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie, A Tale of Love and Fallout by Lauren Redniss

New York Magazine

  • The Enculturated Gene: Sickle Cell Health Politics and Biological Difference in West Africa by Duana Fullwiley
  • The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Best Science Books 2011: The Independent

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: The Independent Biography: Near-deaths and divine rebirths, History: Countries of the mind, Science & Nature: Planetary possibilities.

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Steven Pinker
  • The Beginning of Infinity: Explanations That Transform the World by David Deutsch
  • Proust Was a Neuroscientist by Jonah Lehrer
  • The New North: The World in 2050 by Laurence C. Smith
  • The Lost Photographs of Captain Scott: Unseen Images from the Legendary Antarctic Expedition by David M. Wilson
  • Geek Nation: How Indian Science is Taking Over the World by Angela Saini
  • A More Perfect Heaven: How Copernicus Revolutionized the Cosmos by Dava Sobel
  • Missing Links: In Search of Human Origins by John Reader
  • The Origin of Our Species by Chris Stringer
  • The Address Book: Our Place in the Scheme of Things by Tim Radford
  • The Better Angels of Our Nature: The Decline of Violence in History and Its Causes by Steven Pinker
  • Unnatural: The Heretical Idea of Making People by Philip Ball
  • The Magic of Reality: How we know what's really true by Richard Dawkins and Dave McKean
  • The Perfumier and the Stinkhorn by Richard Mabey

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

Around the Web: Resources on academic blogging and social media use

I'm doing a short presentation tomorrow on blogging for researchers as part of a day-long communications workshop for faculty here at York. And since a few months back I created a reading list for a social media presentation for grad students, I thought I'd expand that list in this post and add some more specifically blogging-related resources.

Enjoy!

Feel free to add any suggestions in the comments.

Best Science Books 2011: The Guardian

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: The Guardian Books for giving: science, Biography, History, Nature.

  • Incoming!: or, Why We Should Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Meteorite by Ted Nield
  • Survivors: The Animals and Plants That Time Has Left Behind by Richard Fortey
  • Here on Earth: A New Beginning by Tim Flannery
  • The Beginning of Infinity: Explanations That Transform the World by David Deutsch
  • World in the Balance: The Historic Quest for an Absolute System of Measurement by Robert P. Crease
  • The Genius in My Basement by Alexander Mastersb
  • Britain's War Machine: Weapons, Resources and Experts in the Second World War by David Edgerton
  • Inside Nature's Giants by David Dugan and Richard Dawkins
  • Planet Dinosaur by Cavan Scott and Darren Naish
  • Frozen Planet by Alastair Fothergill, Vanessa Berlowitz and David Attenborough
  • Plant Pests by David V Alford
  • Plant Galls by Margaret Redfer
  • Marches by Andrew Allott
  • Collins Bird Guide
  • The Urban Birder by David Lindo
  • Big Cats: Facing Britain's Wild Predators by Rick Minter
  • Animal London: A Spotter's Guide by Ianthe Ruthven
  • The Royal Entomological Society Book of British Insects by Peter C Barnard
  • The Handbook of the Mammals of the World: volume 2, Hoofed Mammals edited by Don E Wilson and Russell A Mittermeier
  • The Handbook of the Birds of the World: Volume 16: Tanagers to New World Blackbirds edited by Josep del Hoyo, Andrew Elliot and David A Christie

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.