Archive for: December, 2011

Best Science Books 2011: Coffee Theory, New Yorker, Early Word, Dan Curtis, Huffington Post

Dec 31 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

Coffee Theory: The 10 Best Books I Read in 2011

  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer

The New Yorker Favorite Books from 2011 & Malcolm Gladwell

  • Adventures in the Orgasmatron: How the Sexual Revolution Came to America by Christopher Turner
  • Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie: A Tale of Love and Fallout by Lauren Redniss

Early Words

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Dan Curtis: The Best Biography & Memoir Books of 2011

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • Bird Cloud: A Memoir by Annie Proulx

Huffington Post: 11 Best Books Of 2011

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

2 responses so far

Best Science Books 2011: Readings, Seattle Times, Book Reporter, Chicago Tribune

Dec 30 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:


Readings Best Non-Fiction of 2011

  • The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson
  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Seattle Times 32 of the year's best books

  • Fire Season -- Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout by Philip Connors
  • Never Say Die: The Myth and Marketing of the New Old Age by Susan Jacoby
  • Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution by Holly Tucker
  • The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World by Daniel Yergin


Book Reporter Reviewers Pick Their Favorite Books of 2011

  • The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth: Popularity, Quirk Theory, and Why Outsiders Thrive After High School by Alexandra Robbins

Chicago Tribune

  • A More Perfect Heaven: How Copernicus Revolutionized the Cosmos by Dava Sobel
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Friday Fun: Large Hadron Collider finds car keys

Dec 30 2011 Published by under friday fun

News Biscuit. My new best comedy web friend.

Forget that dangnabit "God Particle," finally one of them there sciencey gizmos has been put to some useful purpose!

Large Hadron Collider finds car keys

It cost some £6.2 billion to build, but the Large Hadron Collider may have justified that enormous price tag after it finally located Professor Brian Cox's lost car keys. The keys were lost by Cox in the 1990s while an undergraduate at the University of Manchester and his 1987 Nissan Micra has remained in an NCP car park ever since.

'When the car keys disappeared it soon became clear that there was an effect here that had major ramifications for the world of physics,' said Cox. 'The keys had clearly undergone an inter-dimensional shift which had moved them through time, space, or one of the many other dimensions posited to exist, in such a way as to render them invisible to the human eye. Also, the car had been clamped and was clocking up £100 a day in storage charges, so it was vital we found an answer quick.'

*snip*

Cox is now hoping to win the Nobel prize with his discovery in order to help pay off the massive fine that is due to get his car unclamped.

Yes, that Brian Cox.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: NPR

Dec 30 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: NPR Best Books 2011

  • Theodore Gray's Elements Vault: Treasures of the Periodic Table With 20 Removable Archival Documents, a Model Pop-up Atom, a Poster, Plus 10 Real Elements Including Pure Gold! by by Theodore Gray and Nick Mann
  • Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie: A Tale Of Love & Fallout by Lauren Redniss
  • Steve Jobs: A Biography by Walter Isaacson,
  • The True Story of 28,800 Bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, Including the Author, Who Went in Search of Them by Donovan Hohn
  • The Toaster Project: Or A Heroic Attempt To Build A Simple Electric Appliance From Scratch by Thomas Thwaites

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

3 responses so far

Best Science Books 2011: Kansas City Star, Salon, Slate, Zocalo Public Square

Dec 29 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:

Kansas City Star Top 100 Books of 2011

  • Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature, and the Shaping of the American Nation by Andrea Wulf
  • The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960 by Douglas Brinkley
  • Tomatoland by Barry Estabrook


Salon Best Non-fiction of 2011

  • The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick

Slate Best Books 2011

  • The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry by Jon Ronson
  • Unnatural Selection: Choosing Boys Over Girls, and the Consequences of a World Full of Men by Mara Hvistendahl

Zocalo Public Square Just Buy These 10 Books Now

  • World in the Balance: The Historic Quest for an Absolute System of Measurement by Robert P. Crease
  • Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World by Jane McGonigal
  • Railroaded: The Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern America by Richard White

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: Publishers Weekly, Council on Foreign Relations, St. Louis Today, Barnes & Noble

Dec 29 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another bunch of lists for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following:


Publishers Weekly Best Books 2011

  • The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick


Council on Foreign Relations: Michael Levi Holiday Reading

  • The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World by Daniel Yergin

St. Louis Today Round-up of Favourite Books in 2011

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Barnes & Noble

  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  • The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick
  • Fire Monks: Zen Mind Meets Wildfire at the Gates of Tassajara by Colleen Morton Busch
  • Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World by Richard Rhodes

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Best Social Media Books 2011: Frogloop

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Five Social Media Books you Should Read.

Yeah, I know this really isn't science -- and I'm not even labelling it as such -- but this is an pretty good list of books from a marketing blog for non-profits so I do see it as being for libraries to at least highlight. Plus I want to keep track of this list for my own use and this is as good a strategy for that as any.

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: io9

Dec 26 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: A Brilliant List of Science Books for People Who Want Their Minds Blown.

  • Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution by Holly Tucker
  • Eruptions that Shook the World by Clive Oppenheimer
  • Radioactivity: A History of a Mysterious Science by Marjorie Malley
  • The Panic Virus: The True Story Behind The Vaccine Autism Controversy by Seth Mnookin
  • The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through The Madness Industry by Jon Ronson
  • The Information by James Gleick
  • Science Ink: Tattoos of the Science Obsessed by Carl Zimmer
  • Unnatural Selection: Choosing Boys Over Girls, and the Consequences of a World Full of Men by Mara Hvistendahl
  • Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain by David Eagleman
  • Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World by Jane McGonigal
  • The Physics of the Future by Michiko Kaku
  • Sex at Dawn: How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships by Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jethá
  • Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World by Richard Rhodes

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

One response so far

Best Science Books 2011: New Scientist

Dec 24 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: New Scientist (via Culture Lab blog).

  • The Folly of Fools: The Logic of Deceit and Self-Deception in Human Life by Robert Trivers
  • The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True by Richard Dawkins
  • The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Steven Pinker
  • Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain by David Eagleman
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  • Knocking on Heaven's Door: How Physics and Scientific Thinking Illuminate the Universe and the Modern World by Lisa Randall
  • The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos by Brian Greene
  • Survivors by Richard Fortey
  • The Beginning of Infinity: Explanations That Transform the World by David Deutsch
  • Harnessed: How Language and Music Mimicked Nature and Transformed Ape to Man by Mark Changizi

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Friday Fun: Recreation of Infamous Bridge Collapse Exonerates Engineers

Dec 23 2011 Published by under friday fun

Thanks be to the Flying Spaghetti Monster for the Cronk of Higher Ed. That is all.

Recreation of Infamous Bridge Collapse Exonerates Engineers

Researchers at the U.S. Marine Academy's civil engineering labs have determined that the designers of the original Tacoma Narrows Bridge were not responsible for that structure's spectacular 1940 collapse.

"It's those videos," commented Dr. Ramsey Archer, head of the research team. "Millions of people have seen footage of the bridge's gyrating plunge over and over again, ad nauseam. Very cool to watch, but it's lousy science."

Dr. Ramsey's idea was to have cadets, as the Marine Academy's students are known, build a 1/200th scale replica of the bridge and reproduce the winds that destroyed it.

*snip*

The research team did not offer any firm theories as to what caused the original bridge's demise.

"Maybe terrorism," said Capt. Hale Vessel, associate chair of the Marine Academy's civil engineering department. "Or maybe the paint they used corroded the cables. Who the heck knows? Anyway, at least nobody died. Though it is a shame about that little dog."

Students participating in the study received credit for a senior practicum in structural mechanics, a course colloquially known as "Hoist and Duck."

"It was a great opportunity," commented one of the students. "And almost as much fun as blowing things up."

3 responses so far

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