Archive for: November, 2011

Best Science Books 2011: Booklist Online

Nov 30 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Booklist Online Biography, Environment, Business.

  • Galileo by John Heilbron
  • American Eden: From Monticello to Central Park; What Our Gardens Tell Us about Who We Are by Wade Graham
  • Animal Factory: The Looming Threat of Industrial Pig, Dairy, and Poultry Farms to Humans and the Environment by David Kirby
  • Green Gone Wrong: How Our Economy Is Undermining the Environmental Revolution by Heather Rogers
  • The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960 by Douglas Brinkley
  • Running Dry: A Journey from Source to Sea down the Colorado River by Jonathan Waterman
  • The Story of Stuff: How Our Obsession with Stuff Is Trashing the Planet, Our Communities, and Our Health--and a Vision for Change by Annie Leonard and Ariane Conrad
  • The View from Lazy Point: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World by Carl Safina
  • The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires by Tim Wu

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: Boing Boing Gift Guide 2011

Nov 29 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Boing Boing Gift Guide 2011.

  • The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry by Jon Ronson
  • The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You by Eli Pariser
  • Wicked Bugs: The Louse That Conquered Napoleon's Army & Other Diabolical Insects by Amy Stewart
  • Biopunk: DIY Scientists Hack the Software of Life by Marcus Wohlson
  • Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World by Jane McGonigal
  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer
  • Kraken: The Curious, Exciting, and Slightly Disturbing Science of Squid by Wendy Williams
  • Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology by Alexis Madrigal
  • The Compass of Pleasure: How Our Brains Make Fatty Foods, Orgasm, Exercise, Marijuana, Generosity, Vodka, Learning, and Gambling Feel So Good by David J. Linden
  • The Open Laboratory 2010 By Bora Zivkovic, Jason Goldman
  • The Physics Book: From the Big Bang to Quantum Resurrection, 250 Milestones in the History of Physics by Clifford A. Pickover
  • The Beekeeper's Lament: How One Man and Half a Billion Honey Bees Help Feed America by Hannah Nordhaus
  • Annoying: The Science of What Bugs Us by Joe Palca and Flora Lichtman
  • The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick
  • Creative License: The Law and Culture of Digital Sampling by Kembrew McLeod and Peter DiCola
  • Context: Further Selected Essays on Productivity, Creativity, Parenting, and Politics in the 21st Century by Cory Doctorow

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: The Financial Times

Nov 28 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: The Financial Times.

  • Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier and Happier by Edward Glaeser
  • Steve Jobs: The Exclusive Biography by Walter Isaacson
  • DarkMarket: CyberThieves, CyberCops and You by Misha Glenny
  • The Quest: Energy, Security and the Remaking of the Modern World by Daniel Yergin
  • Reinventing Discovery: The New Era of Networked Science by Michael Nielsen
  • The Better Angels of Our Nature: The Decline of Violence in History and Its Causes by Steven Pinker
  • The Tell-Tale Brain: Unlocking the Mystery of Human Nature by VS Ramachandran
  • Rat Island: Predators in Paradise and the World's Greatest Wildlife Rescue by William Stolzenburg

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: The Globe and Mail 100

Nov 28 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: The Globe 100.

  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer
  • The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick
  • Here on Earth: A Natural History of the Planet by Tim Flannery
  • The Immortalization Commission: Science and the Strange Quest to Cheat Death by John Gray
  • The Chimps of Fauna Sanctuary: A Canadian Story of Resilience and Recovery by Andrew Westoll
  • The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry by Jon Ronson
  • Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain by David Eagleman
  • Phoenix: The Life of Norman Bethune by Roderick and Sharon Stewart
  • Empire of the Beetle: How Human Folly and a Tiny Bug are Killing North America's Great Forests by Andrew Nikiforuk
  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • DarkMarket: Cyberthieves, Cybercops and You by Misha Glenny

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Around the Web: Textmining scandals, Bright kids, If I were dean and more

Nov 26 2011 Published by under Uncategorized

No responses yet

Friday Fun: 'Youngest' expedition to South Pole abandoned after 3rd day without Twitter

Nov 25 2011 Published by under friday fun

Kids today! They just can't suffer deprivation like we could back in my day!

Take a look: 'Youngest' expedition to South Pole abandoned after 3rd day without Twitter.

Plucky 20 year-old Belinda Baron had to abandon her attempt to be recognised as the youngest person to reach the South Pole on skis, after becoming cut off from all social networks for nearly 72 hours. Baron described the experience as 'chilling', claiming she hadn't experienced such feelings of isolation since switching her phone off on the flight out.

Baron had spent months planning her expedition, and took advice from Ranulph Fiennes. 'Ranulph is a lovely man, and has a lot of experience at failing to get to the Poles' said Baron, 'he was very generous with his time. We spent over a month together training, by the end of it I almost felt like I knew him, despite him not having a Facebook account.'

*snipt*

Mobile data signals are notoriously weak in the South Pole, but that didn't stop Baron from fiddling with her phone almost constantly. 'I was very keen to tweet my progress, but I never saw more than one bar, all the time I was there' she confided. 'Fortunately, that didn't stop me from playing Angry Birds.'

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: Strategy + Business

Nov 24 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: Strategy + Business Best Business Books 2011, Technology. (Free registration & login required.)

  • What Technology Wants by Kevin Kelley
  • In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives by Steven Levy
  • Final Jeopardy: Man vs. Machine and the Quest to Know Everything by Stephen Baker

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: New York Times Notable Books

Nov 23 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following: New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2011.

  • The Better Angels of our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Steven Pinker
  • The Boy in the Moon: A Father's Journey to Understand His Extraordinary Son by Ian Brown
  • Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine, and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard
  • The Information: A History. A Theory. A Flood by James Gleick
  • Knocking on Heaven's Door: How Physics and Scientific Thinking Illuminate the Universe and the Modern World by Lisa Randall
  • Moby Duck: The True Story of 28,800 Bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, Including the Author, Who Went in Search of Them by Donovan Hohn
  • The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom by Evgeny Morozov
  • The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World by Daniel Yergin
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

No responses yet

Best Science Books 2011: Amazon.ca Editors

Nov 22 2011 Published by under best science books 2011, science books

Another list for your reading, gift-giving and collection development pleasure.

Every year for the last bunch of years I've been linking to and posting about all the "year's best sciencey books" lists that appear in various media outlets and shining a bit of light on the best of the year.

For my purposes, I define science books pretty broadly to include science, engineering, computing, history & philosophy of science & technology, environment, social aspects of science and even business books about technology trends or technology innovation. Deciding what is and isn't a science book is squishy at best, especially at the margins, but in the end I pick books that seem broadly about science and technology rather than something else completely. Lists of business, history or nature books are among the tricky ones.

All the previous 2011 lists are here.

This post includes the following for the Amazon.ca Editors list: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Nonfiction, Outdoors & Nature, Science.

Note that this list is somewhat similar to but not completely the same as the main Amazon list.

  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives by Steven Levy
  • History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor
  • Radioactivity: A History of a Mysterious Science by Marjorie C. Malley
  • Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard
  • The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Steven Pinker
  • Moonwalking With Einstein: Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer
  • Maphead: Charting the Wide, Weird World of Geography Wonks by Ken Jennings
  • Chimps Of Fauna Sanctuary by Andrew Westoll
  • The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick
  • Fire Season: Field Notes From A Wilderness Lookout by Philip Connors
  • Kraken: The Curious, Exciting, and Slightly Disturbing Science of Squid by Wendy Williams
  • The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water by Charles Fishman
  • The Bond: Our Kinship with Animals, Our Call to Defend Them by Wayne Pacelle
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  • Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku
  • The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos by Brian Greene
  • The Crash Course: The Unsustainable Future Of Our Economy, Energy, And Environment by Chris Martenson
  • Knocking On Heaven's Door by Lisa Randall
  • Infinite Reality: Avatars, Eternal Life, New Worlds, and the Dawn of the Virtual Revolution by Jim Blascovich
  • The Most Human Human: What Talking with Computers Teaches Us About What It Means to Be Alive by Brian Christian
  • The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True by Richard Dawkins

I'm always looking for recommendations and notifications of book lists as they appear in various media outlets. If you see one that I haven't covered, please let me know at jdupuis at yorku dot ca or in the comments.

I am picking up a lot of lists from Largehearted Boy.

The summary post for 2010 books is here and all the posts for 2010 can be found here. For 2009, it's here and here.

And if you wish to support my humble list-making efforts, run on over to Amazon, take a look at Steve Jobs and consider picking that one up or something else from the lists.

One response so far

Around the Web: The Academic Librarianship -- A Crisis or an Opportunity? symposium

Nov 21 2011 Published by under academia, librarianship

This past Friday there was a one-day symposium on the state of academic librarianship at the University of Toronto entitled Academic Librarianship - A Crisis or an Opportunity?.

In response to recent developments in academic libraries in Ontario and elsewhere, academic librarians are invited to gather to discuss the challenges facing the profession of academic librarianship today.

This one-day Symposium will serve as an opportunity to hear stakeholders' views of the profession as well as an opportunity for academic librarians to explore ways of re-affirming the legitimacy and the integrity of academic librarianship both now and as we move forward in the future.

The Symposium will be organized around three main themes: library education and curriculum, the role of professional associations and the value of professional accreditation, and labour issues.

Some of the "recent developments" pertain to the material I collected on my McMastergate post.

Unfortunately I missed the symposium itself and even had the kind of day where I missed most of the tweeting.

However, I have caught most of the post-symposium blog posts and other stories and thought I would collect them here.

Of course, I'll update as more reactions appear. If I've missed any please let me know either in the comments or at jdupuis at yorku dot ca.

Update 2011.11.22: Added item with McGill statement.

3 responses so far

Older posts »